The story

Plaster Copy of the Nike



The Nike logo (symbol) and the history behind its simple design

Everybody around the world is familiar with one of the most iconic and well-known shoe brands, Nike. Not only the shoe but its unique and simple Nike symbol. The Nike logo is a perfect example of the importance of visuals that builds brands that are recognized and trustworthy.

There was a time when this Nike emblem was a humble and rather insignificant symbol, but it became a sports symbol that is globally recognized. The Nike swoosh logo is one of the world’s most recognized logos.

It would make sense if I told you that top branding firms or advertising companies collaborated to come up with such a unique logo.

However, that is far from the truth as the Nike Swoosh logo comes from Carolyn Davidson, a graphic designer.

She designed the Nike logo in 1971 for a mere $35. The original Nike logo was called strip, which later changed to Swoosh which is in referral to the Nike fibers used then. In 1972 the Nike Swoosh logo was first seen on the shoes. Then, the logo was still on the shoe’s vamp.

Side note: Do you want to increase your chances of getting a better design job? Get a Graphic Design Specialization from CalArts (California Institute of the Arts).

A brief history of Nike

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Nike’s story started with two people seven years before it was founded. Philip Knight, who was a track athlete from the University of Oregon, collaborated with his coach Bill Bowerman to design athletic shoes. At the time, he founded a company called Blue Ribbon Shoes who distributed shoes for Onitsuka Tiger, a Japanese brand which is today known as Asics.

The logo used was a combination of the store’s initials. The Nike brand is headquartered in Washington Country Oregon under the leadership of Phil Knight and Bill Bowerman. Even though they founded the brand in 1964, they changed their name in 1978 from Blue Ribbon Sports to Nike.

Nowadays, over 44,000 employees are employed by Nike across the world. The company has massive assets with a worth of $15 billion. There are over 700 Nike outlets across the globe. Nike sells a wide range of products aside from shoes that also carry this famous Nike logo.

Victory’s Wing

The name Nike has a great history as it is named after an ancient Greek Goddess. According to Greek folklore, it is said that Nike, the Goddess was the reason why warriors won numerous battles for their motherland. Each time they won a battle they used to say, Nike, to each other.

The goddess’ wings are called swoosh and history has it that the wings brought audacity and motivation to warriors when they headed towards the battlefields. Experts like to believe that this was the main reason behind the design of the Swoosh Nike logo.

Who is Carolyn Davidson?

The graphic design student, Carolyn Davidson from Portland State University met Phil Knight in 1969. She was just another poor student looking for ways to earn extra money. Phil Knight was looking for someone to help him to design a logo and he turned to her.

He offered her $2 an hour to help him design a Nike logo. Phil Knight wanted an image or stripe that could come on the side of their athletic shoe. She decided on the Swoosh, which as we know it is a check marked shape which is both fluid and resembles speed and movement.

At the same time is it hinting after the name of the Greek Goddess, Nike, as the image also resembles a wing. Even though Knight was initially unhappy with the logo, he still accepted it and the logo remained. She continued to work for Nike for a few years longer until she decided to work from home.

Small Job, Big Payoff

Carolyn Davidson was paid $2 per hour and she billed Phil Knight for 17.5 hours which gave her a paycheck of $35. She continued to work for Nike for four years, and eventually got $1 million and a ring of gold and diamonds in the Swoosh design.


If you're interested in registering a trademark, there are five different trademark levels that you could choose:

  • Fanciful: A fanciful trademark consists of a word that has no meaning outside of the mark. An example of this would be Kodak.
  • Arbitrary: These trademarks are words that exist in reality, but are not used to describe the actual products of the company. An example of this is Apple, a company that makes computers and other tech products.
  • Suggestive: A suggestive mark is a trademark that implies a connection between a company and a product.
  • Descriptive: A descriptive trademark describes the exact good that the company provides.
  • Generic: These marks are comprised of generic words or phrases such as “computer store.”

Step 2: Prepare Your Castee

Make sure your castee is OK to discard the shirt they are wearing, as it will get alginate all over it and that is very difficult or impossible to get out.

Have your castee sit comfortably in a chair that is metal or plastic, or covered with a dropcloth. They'll need to keep relatively still for around half an hour to 45 minutes. In my internet research I always saw people rubbing vaseline on eyebrows and around the edges of the hair, but I find that this does not help very much in preventing the alginate from sticking to the hair, and it darkens the plaster cast in spots if you don't get it all off the alginate before pouring. I call this optional.


ɻo Knows' (1989)

For a one-of-a-kind athlete, ad agency Wieden + Kennedy needed a one-of-a-kind ad campaign.

Wieden + Kennedy highlighted Bo Jackson's versatility as both a professional football and baseball player in a series of ads based on the premise that Jackson's skills extended well beyond his two sports of choice.

The "Bo Knows" series yielded one of the most memorable commercials of all time, which used special effects to treat viewers to a room full of Bo Jacksons clad in various ridiculous sporting outfits. More importantly for Nike, the ads dramatically improved the company's cross-trainer sales, helping it regain its position as America's biggest athletic shoe company.


FAQs on Buying Nike Copy Shoes

Do the shoes come with free shipping?

Yes most sellers offer free shipping. But be warned, they might take longer to come. The paid options range from $2 to $10 per shipping and this depends on the location. But you will get your shipment within a week.

What are the most popular Nikes and are there replicas for them?

Currently the most popular Nike’s are

  • Nike Joyride Flyknit – Yes
  • Vapormax – Yes
  • Nike Airmax 90 – Yes
  • Nike Air Max 270 – Yes
  • Nike Air Force – Yes
  • Nike Air Max 90 – Yes
  • Nike Air Vapor Max 2.0 – Yes
  • Nike Air Max 720 – Yes
  • Jordan Off White Chicago – Yes
  • Cortez – No
  • Blazer – No

There are replicas available for most of these Nike’s.

What is the best selling Nike shoes of all time?

There is no exact number unless Nike publishes it, but based on popular demand, it was the Nike Air Jordan’s

What are the different types of Nike shoes?

Nike makes running shoes, basketball shoes, skateboarding shoes, casual sport shoes.

Which Nike shoes are the most comfortable?

If you want pure and true comfort, then Nike running shoes are the best. The soles protect your heel from impact and eventually, pain.

What is the best website for fake shoes?

Fake is mimicking the logo. Replica is a better term. There are numerous sites for replica shoes. But most importantly Dhgate and Aliexpress have a good collection.

What are replica sneakers?

Replica sneakers are imitation sneakers. The manufacturers don’t necessarily want to pass off their shoes as original Nike’s.

That is why, they don’t add the logo in some cases or they modify it a bit.
Replica sneakers are legal and are not illegal. Fake sneakers are illegal as they circumvent the copyright of the brand.

Where to buy fake nikes?

There are numerous sites that will advertise fake nikes, but you are probably looking for copy of Nike shoes that look the same and also feel the same. The best Nike fakes can be found on Aliexpress.

Although you type “Nike Aliexpress” on the search bar, it’s hard to find good quality fakes as they are hidden somewhere deep and it takes a lot of digging to find the right ones.

So my suggestion would be to stick to the sellers mentioned above that have the best fake nikes online.

Replica China Shoes – Are they any good?

If you are considering buying from China or a platform like Aliexpress for your replica shoe needs, then there are a few things you need to consider.

The seller you are dealing with must be reputed. So if they are on Aliexpress, they should be a Top Brand or should have considerable history such as orders.

They should have a good positive rating. When you consider all these factors and get a good seller, you can easily get high quality replica shoes such as Nikes at a very low price.

How are Nike Aliexpress sellers able to price their shoes for so cheap?

The truth of the matter is, brands like Nike and Adidas sell their shoes at a premium so that they become an aspirational product for their customer base. The cost of making these shoes will be a fraction of the actual cost.

This is how fake nike sellers are able to sell it for so cheap!


‘Just Do It’: The surprising and morbid origin story of Nike’s slogan

In a plain T-shirt with a bag over his head, Gilmore was strapped into a chair, waiting for a firing squad to execute him at Utah State Prison. It was the morning of Jan. 17, 1977, and Gilmore, convicted of murdering a gas station employee and motel manager in Utah the year before, was to become the first person in the United States to be executed in nearly a decade. The author Norman Mailer wrote in his 1979 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “The Executioner’s Song” that shortly before his execution the 36-year-old Gilmore was asked if he had any last words.

“Let’s do it,” Gilmore reportedly said. As The Washington Post reported at the time, Gilmore did not flinch when he was executed.

The story of Gilmore has been long forgotten by most. But his final words live on in a manner no one would have imagined.

In 1988, Dan Wieden, an advertising executive who co-founded the Wieden+Kennedy agency in Portland, Ore., made something of a morbid pitch to Nike. Long before it became a dominant sports and fashion brand, Nike was struggling in 1987, failing to keep pace with the more fitness-focused approach of Reebok. Like Gilmore, Wieden was a Portland native. He remembered the crimes and the ending.

Wieden said in the 2009 documentary “Art & Copy” that he looked toward the phrase “do it” and used it as the inspiration for his pitch to Nike.

“Certainly, it wasn’t a question of Dan being inspired by Gary Gilmore, but rather, it was about the ultimate statement of intention,” Liz Dolan, former chief marketing officer at Nike, told The Washington Post. “It had to be personal.”

The idea was “Just Do It.” And seemingly everyone Wieden ran the slogan by hated the idea.

“I went to Nike and [Nike co-founder] Phil Knight said, ‘We don’t need that s—,'” Wieden recalled in 2015 to Dezeen magazine, an architecture and design publication. “I said, ‘Just trust me on this one.’ So they trusted me and it went big pretty quickly.”

Shortly thereafter, one of the first ads in 1988 for “Just Do It” featured Walt Stack, an 80-year-old marathon runner in San Francisco. (Stack died in 1995.) From there, “Just Do It” would become the company’s signature slogan, helping to turn a niche brand into a global multibillion-dollar giant and etching the phrase indelibly into the global memory that it’s almost interchangeable with the brand.

On Monday, the slogan took another surprising turn. It was announced that Kaepernick, the NFL free agent quarterback whose kneeling during the national anthem in protest of police shootings of unarmed black men ignited a national controversy, will be the face for the 30th-anniversary campaign celebrating Nike’s “Just Do It” slogan. The news comes as Kaepernick, who could be heading to court for his collusion grievance against the NFL, signed a new multiyear deal to keep him with Nike. Response to the Kaepernick news has already created a backlash on social media, as detractors are voicing their displeasure with #NikeBoycott.

“Believe in something,” the ad stated. “Even if it means sacrificing everything.”

Dolan, who told The Post she started at Nike the month the campaign launched and was at the company until 1998, recalled in “Art & Copy” that the phrase’s origin was not something that was widely talked about, even after it took off.

“It never came up,” Dolan, host and co-creator of the “Satellite Sisters” podcast, told The Post of the origin story. “It was sort of a funny thing inside the company.”

Though the slogan attributed to much of the brand’s success, it was not the only reason for the turnaround. Ask Michael Jordan and Mars Blackmon, the cinematic character played by Spike Lee. In February 1988, Jordan and Lee teamed up to release films in support of the Air Jordan shoe line. “Just Do It” was also part of an aggressive marketing campaign in 1988, with Nike spending a reported $40 million on advertising that year. Still, Jerome Conlon, then the company’s director of brand planning and marketing insights, wrote in 2015 that “Just Do It” represented a major turning point.


‘Just Do It’: The surprising and morbid origin story of Nike’s slogan

In a plain T-shirt with a bag over his head, Gilmore was strapped into a chair, waiting for a firing squad to execute him at Utah State Prison. It was the morning of Jan. 17, 1977, and Gilmore, convicted of murdering a gas station employee and motel manager in Utah the year before, was to become the first person in the United States to be executed in nearly a decade. The author Norman Mailer wrote in his 1979 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “The Executioner’s Song” that shortly before his execution, 36-year-old Gilmore was asked if he had any last words.

“Let’s do it,” Gilmore reportedly said. As the Washington Post reported at the time, Gilmore did not flinch when he was executed.

The story of Gilmore has been long forgotten by most. But his final words live on in a manner no one would have imagined.

In 1988, Dan Wieden, an advertising executive who co-founded the Wieden+Kennedy agency in Portland, Ore., made something of a morbid pitch to Nike. Long before it became a dominant sports and fashion brand, Nike was struggling in 1987, failing to keep pace with the more fitness-focused approach of Reebok. Like Gilmore, Wieden was a Portland native. He remembered the crimes and the ending.

Wieden said in the 2009 documentary “Art & Copy” that he looked toward the phrase “do it” and used it as the inspiration for his pitch to Nike.

“Certainly, it wasn’t a question of Dan being inspired by Gary Gilmore, but rather, it was about the ultimate statement of intention,” said Liz Dolan, former chief marketing officer at Nike. “It had to be personal.”

The idea was “Just Do It.” And seemingly everyone Wieden ran the slogan by hated the idea.

“I went to Nike and [Nike co-founder] Phil Knight said, ‘We don’t need that,’” Wieden recalled in 2015 to Dezeen magazine, an architecture and design publication. “I said, ‘Just trust me on this one.’ So they trusted me and it went big pretty quickly.”

Shortly thereafter, one of the first ads in 1988 for “Just Do It” featured Walt Stack, an 80-year-old marathon runner in San Francisco. (Stack died in 1995.) From there, “Just Do It” would become the company’s signature slogan, helping to turn a niche brand into a global multibillion-dollar giant and etching the phrase so indelibly into the global memory that it’s almost interchangeable with the brand.

On Monday, the slogan took another surprising turn. It was announced that Kaepernick — the NFL free agent quarterback whose kneeling during the national anthem in protest of police shootings of unarmed black men ignited a national controversy — will be the face for the 30th-anniversary campaign celebrating Nike’s “Just Do It” slogan. The news comes as Kaepernick signed a new multiyear deal to keep him with Nike. The deal has already seen backlash on social media, with detractors calling for a boycott of Nike.

Kaepernick does not play on an NFL team: The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback says team owners have colluded to keep him off any NFL roster since he hit free agency in 2017. Last week, an arbitrator denied the NFL’s request that his collusion grievance against the league be thrown out.

“Believe in something,” the Nike ad featuring Kaepernick states. “Even if it means sacrificing everything.”

Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything. #JustDoIt pic.twitter.com/SRWkMIDdaO

&mdash Colin Kaepernick (@Kaepernick7) September 3, 2018

Dolan, who said she started at Nike the month the “Just Do It” campaign launched and was at the company until 1998, recalled in “Art & Copy” that the phrase’s origin was not something that was widely talked about, even after it took off.

“It never came up,” Dolan, host and co-creator of the “Satellite Sisters” podcast, said of the origin story. “It was sort of a funny thing inside the company.”

Although much of the brand’s success was attributed to the slogan, the line was not the only reason for Nike’s turnaround. Ask Michael Jordan and Mars Blackmon, the cinematic character played by Spike Lee. In February 1988, Jordan and Lee teamed up to release films in support of the Air Jordan shoe line. “Just Do It” was also part of an aggressive marketing campaign in 1988, with Nike spending a reported $40 million on advertising that year.

Still, Jerome Conlon, then the company’s director of brand planning and marketing insights, wrote in 2015 that “Just Do It” represented a major turning point.

“After the launch of Just Do It, Nike brand sales were rejuvenated, increasing 1,000% over the next ten years,” Conlon wrote for Branding Strategy Insider. “And Nike truly stepped into its role as one of the world’s [premier] iconic and soulful brands.”

Wieden said in the 2009 documentary that neither he nor the members of his team gave much thought to the long-term influence of the ad, or to the Gilmore connection.

“None of us really paid that much attention,” Wieden said in an interview in “Art & Copy.” “We thought, yeah that’d work.”

He added: “I think what happened and it was sort of, like with a lot of things in life, it’s the most inadvertent things you don’t really see. People started reading things into it, much more than sport.”

Nike aligning Kaepernick with “Just Do It” is the latest chapter in the company’s history of responding to issues resonating with the public at a given moment. Two of its most prominent examples came in 1995. That year, Nike used “Just Do It” to focus attention on women’s rights in athletics with its “If You Let Me Play” ad.

That same year, Nike featured Ric Munoz, a Los Angeles marathon runner who was HIV-positive.

The endurance of the slogan is a credit to the essence of the message, Dolan said. She said she started at Nike shortly before the ad campaign was launched and that the company would try to think of something better each year. She remembered the letters Nike would receive from people telling them how three simple words inspired them. With that came the pressure to create something just as good.

But when it came down to it, Dolan said, Nike did not have to redo the slogan rather, the slogan could be redesigned with powerful and personal stories. That ability to do so for 30 years, especially at a moment when Kaepernick and his story have taken center stage, is the campaign’s greatest legacy, she said.

The “Just Do It” slogan “wasn’t about a company telling you what to do,” Dolan said. “It was a company telling you that you know what the right thing is to do. It’s something like what Colin Kaepernick has done.”


Nike Swoosh Logo vs Newport Cigarettes Swoosh Logo


Either you know and it’s old news, you know and don’t care, or it’s new news to you. I recall hearing about this a while back, but it left my memory an equally long time ago.

It is however an interesting example of how one brand mark, Nike in this case, is late to the party. That through sheer dominance, exerts it’s brand awareness to a point where no one would even think to question they were not originators of the so called infamous ‘Swoosh’.

In an ideal world, which of course this isn’t, but it it were, the Nike ‘swoosh’ should be referred to as the Newport Swoosh, but personally don’t see that taking off.

Nike and Newport History

It’s a little but more interesting though when you dig around the history of the two companies.

Newport was introduced in 1957, a brand of menthol cigarettes produced by Lorillard Tobacco Company of Greensboro, North Carolina, United States.

Nike was actually formed on January 25, 1964 as Blue Ribbon Sports by Bill Bowerman and Philip Knight, and officially became Nike, Inc. in 1978. The Nike swoosh is a logo design created in 1971 by Carolyn Davidson, over a decade after Newport Cigarettes came into being.

So Nike in fact VERY late in using the Newport Swoosh as it’s own brandmark. Interesting that they are in effect total opposites in terms of business focus, both health related, with very different agenda’s.

There is also another interesting fact found on Wikipedia. “During the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, the Discovery Channel displayed a track shoe allegedly worn by U.S. legend Jesse Owens at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. This shoe had on it a prominent symbol appearing identical to the Nike swoosh.

Have tried to track down a photo of this, but so far have failed, but interesting again to see that really, this Nike Swoosh is not so ‘great’, it’s just made great by the sheer power of the people who buy Nike gear.

No doubt this mark is a powerful brand icon, it has simplicity and boldness, but it’s far from original. The same could be said for Apple’s logo of course, but that’s another story.

Have also tried to track down any information on the designer of the Newport Swoosh logo, but so far drawn a blank.

What do Nike and Newport have in common

Found this interesting video below on the sameness of the Nike and Newport logo. Via Xplosiveworld.com.

Vintage Newport Advertisement

For some added bonus points, here is a lovely vintage Newport Cigarette advertisement circa 1970. One of a series of “Newport Men of the Sea”. What a man.

Final thoughts

This whole topic of plagiarism and inspiration is a tricky subject by far. I think many designers at some point have designed something that has proven to exist elsewhere. Their own process of design and brainstorming evolves what to them is a unique idea.

It’s happened to me and I know it’s happened to many others. An idea is not unique, it’s naive to assume that more than one person in the entire world is NOT capable of having the same idea, created from different circumstances and inspiration.

Or that indeed two people on opposite sides of the world both being inspired by something similar and coming up with an almost identical design is again more than possible.

Being inspired on a conscious level is quite different to being inspired on a sub conscious level, where we believe what we are designing is formed from our own creative process, but was in fact inspired by seeing someone long ago, but long forgotten.

Until you are faced with that very same original inspiration, brought to you by another designer, along with a comment of ‘you copied their design’.

Your reaction is that you didn’t copy it, but if you allow yourself a moment to consider the possibilities, it dawns on you that yes, you were probably inspired on a sub conscious level. But your actions were not deliberate, yet you get ‘called out’ as a faker.

It’s only through the internet that we are now faced with being ‘caught out’ more than was possible pre internet.


The start of Swoosh sports marketing

&ldquoThe amazing thing about Pre was he was a hell of a student of the sport and he just loved digging and learning about things,&rdquo said Geoff Hollister, a runner who also competed at the University of Oregon under Bowerman and became Nike&rsquos third employee. Hollister managed the BRS store in Eugene, and he and Prefontaine became close friends who shared interests in architecture, sports cars, and, of course, running.

The pair visited high schools, colleges, sports stores and running clubs. &ldquoEvery place we went, Pre would take time to go for a jog with the kids. He would analyze their form, and talk to them,&rdquo Hollister said. Prefontiane easily related to teens and was a natural spokesman for the sport. In his book &ldquoOut of Nowhere,&rdquo Hollister remembered a talk Prefontaine had with students at West Albany:

&ldquoYou&rsquove got to have goals, and I suggest you write them down. If you write them down, you own them. Don&rsquot waste your time,&rdquo Prefontaine advised. &lsquoTo give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the gift.&rdquo

Prefontaine took that same personal approach when connecting with athletes from afar, helping to create an early blueprint for Nike&rsquos sports marketing. He introduced the sport&rsquos elite to Nike products, sending shoes, along with personalized notes and his business card, to running friends around the world. &ldquoIt was totally his own idea,&rdquo said Hollister. Prefontaine shipped boxes to Mary Decker in San Diego New Zealand&rsquos John Walker and Dick Quax to Brendan Foster in England and Kenya&rsquos Kip Keino. &ldquoAll those people ended up wearing Nike shoes,&rdquo said Hollister.

In April of 1975, Prefontaine sent a note and a pair of &rsquo73 Nike Bostons to the relatively unknown runner Bill Rodgers. The shoes' arrival created a stir among his teammates at the Greater Boston Track Club. &ldquoYou&rsquod hear about Nike shoes or see pictures, but it was the first pair that I&rsquod seen in person,&rdquo recalled Alberto Salazar, who was a high school student in Boston and a teammate of Rodgers at the time. &ldquoHe brought them to the track, and we were all holding them and passing them around. Everyone was real excited not only because it was a Nike shoe &mdash which was kind of neat because it was different &mdash but because Steve Prefontaine had sent the shoes with a note.&rdquo A few weeks later, Rodgers wore them in the local city marathon. He finished first.

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