The story

Edwards II DD- 619 - History


Edwards II

(DD-619: dp. 1,630; 1. 348'4"; b. 36'1"; dr. 17'5"; s. 37 k.; cpl. 270; a. 4 6", 6 21" tt., 6 dep.' 2 act.; cl. Benson)

The second Edwards (DD -619) was launched 19 July
1942 by Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Kearny N.J.; sponsored by Mrs. Edward Brayton, widow Lieutenant Commander Edwards, and commissioned 18 September 1942, Lieutenant Commander W. L. Messmer in command.

After brief service escorting convoys along the east coast and in the Caribbean, Edwards sailed from New York 8 November 1942 to join the Pacific Fleet She joined TF 18 at Noumea 4 January 1943, to cover a large troop convoy bound for Guadalcanal. On 29 January they were attacked by a swarm of Japanese torpedo bombers off Rennell Island. Although most were driven off by the heavy accurate fire of the ships, enough broke through to put two torpedoes into Chicago (CA-29). Edwards with four other destroyers was detached to screen the damaged cruiser. On the following day, as the group sailed for Espiritu Santo, attacks continued. The destroyers put up a stout defense, but Chicago was torpedoed again and sank. Edwards rescued 224 of the 1,049 survivors. One of the other screening destroyers, La Vallette (DD-448), was also torpedoed, Edwards saw her safely to port before rejoining her task group.

Edwards returned to Pearl Harbor 27 March 1943 for overhaul, then set sail 15 April for the Aleutians. She saw action bombarding Attu 26 April, and as antiscreen for Pennsylvania (BB-38) during the landings of 11 May. The following day she teamed with Farragut IDD-348) for a relentless 10-hour depth charge attack on a submarine which attempted to torpedo the battleship. I-1l was forced to the surface and badly damaged by Edwards' guns before diving, only to be sunk finally by Frazier (DD-607).

Edwards continued to ply stormy Aleutian waters on antisubmarine patrol. In June 1943 she joined the blockade patrol which bombarded Kiska Island 2 and 12 August, and covered the landings on the 13th. After overhaul, she returned to Espiritu Santo in October for training.

On 8 November 1943 Edwards sailed to screen carriers in air strikes on Rabaul on the 11th. A flight of Japanese planes attacked her task group at noon that day, Edwards and her companions drove off or splashed every plane before it could injure any American ship. She screened the support force at Tarawa from 19 November, then escorted transports to Pearl Harbor on route to the west coast for a brief overhaul. On 3 March 1944 she arrived at Majuro off which she patrolled as well as screening strikes on Mili Atoll in the Marshall~ and in the Palaus by carriers of the mighty 5th Fleet In April she guarded the flattops as they launched attacks on New Guinea in coordination with the Hollandia landings. Edwards also figured in the attack on Truk of 29 and 30 April.

From 12 May to 18 August 1944 Edwards destroyer division formed the Eastern Marshalls Patrol Group. They patrolled off the Japanese-held atolls of Mili, Jaluit, Maloelap, and Wotje to keep the enemy from receiving assistance or evacuating. On 22 May the joined Bancroft (DD-598) to put several enemy batteries on Wotje out of action. Again off Wotje 27 June she ignored shore fire to rescue downed aviators drifting toward shore.

After overhaul in Pearl Harbor in August 1944, the veteran Edwards reported arrival at San Pedro Bay Leyte, 30 October for patrol. She joined the assault force for the landings at Ormoc 7 December. Here she splashed several of the hard hitting air attackers as well as aiding ships they had damaged. A resupply echelon to Ormoc met similar opposition but the trusty fourstacker drove off the planes and got the convoy through. On 11 December, she took aboard casualties from Caldwell (DD-605), set on fire by a suicide plane.

The doughty battle-hardened Edwards remained in the Philippines, shepherding supply convoys through by Mindoro, Lingayen Gulf, Polloc Harbor, and Davao Gulf On 9 May 1945 she arrived at Morotai to distinguish herself during the invasion of Borneo, returning to Subic Bay 12 July. She made one voyage to Iwo Jima, another to Okinawa to escort convoys, then sailed 16 September for the States. On 7 January 1946, Edwards arrived at Charleston, S.C., where she was placed out of commission in reserve 11 April 1946.

Edwards received 14 battle stars for World War II service.


Edwards II DD- 619 - History

Heywood L. Edwards in the Pacific war.

After shakedown in the West Indies, Edwards joined the Pacific war in April 1944 attached to newly-formed Destroyer Squadron 56.

At Leyte during the Battle of Surigao Strait, 25 October, Edwards, Leutze and Bennion constituted Section 3 of Destroyer Squadron 56, which launched torpedoes against the enemy column from the west and then searched for surviving enemy ships the following morning.

Heywood L. Edwards earned seven stars on her Asiatic-Pacific campaign ribbon for her service in World War II and the Navy Unit Commendation for &ldquooutstanding heroism in action&rdquo in the Marianas, Palau, Leyte, Iwo Jima and Okinawa operations of 1944&ndash45.

On 10 March 1959, again with the Leary, the Edwards was transferred to Japan. Commissioned as Ariake (&ldquodawn, but still the moon remains in the sky&rdquo or &ldquobreak of dawn&rdquo), she served until scrapped in 1976.


Keys to Diagnosis

HISTORY

When the diagnosis of a generalized rash is not obvious, patients should be asked about recent travel, insect and plant exposure, drug exposure (including over-the-counter drugs, alternative medications, and illicit drugs), contact with persons who are ill, pets, hobbies, occupational exposures, chemical exposure, chronic illness, sexual history, and recent systemic symptoms, especially fever (Table 1) . Patients should be asked about pruritus, painful lesions, the initial site of involvement, and any personal or family history of atopy (e.g., asthma, allergic rhinitis, childhood eczema).

Generalized Rash: Conditions Suggested by Patient History

Fifth disease (i.e., erythema infectiosum)

Roseola (i.e., exanthem subitum, sixth disease)

Viral exanthem, nonspecific

Lupus (subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus)

Insect and arthropod exposure

Rocky Mountain spotted fever

Recent systemic symptoms, fever

Fifth disease (i.e., erythema infectiosum)

Roseola (i.e., exanthem subitum, sixth disease)

Viral exanthem, nonspecific

Rocky Mountain spotted fever

HIV = human immunodeficiency virus .

Generalized Rash: Conditions Suggested by Patient History

Fifth disease (i.e., erythema infectiosum)

Roseola (i.e., exanthem subitum, sixth disease)

Viral exanthem, nonspecific

Lupus (subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus)

Insect and arthropod exposure

Rocky Mountain spotted fever

Recent systemic symptoms, fever

Fifth disease (i.e., erythema infectiosum)

Roseola (i.e., exanthem subitum, sixth disease)

Viral exanthem, nonspecific

Rocky Mountain spotted fever

HIV = human immunodeficiency virus .

The patient's age may help narrow the possible diagnoses. For example, acute maculopapular rashes in children are usually caused by viral infections, whereas in adults they are usually caused by drug reactions.2 Some rashes are rare in children (e.g., nummular eczema, lichen planus, dermatitis herpetiformis), whereas others are rare in adults (e.g., roseola, Kawasaki disease, scarlet fever).

Patients should be asked about pruritus, because some conditions routinely cause intense pruritus (e.g., scabies, urticaria, atopic dermatitis), whereas others are usually nonpruritic (e.g., seborrheic dermatitis, secondary syphilis, many viral exanthems Table 2 ). Most generalized rashes are not painful, but Sweet syndrome, Kawasaki disease, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome are exceptions.

Generalized Rash: Conditions Associated with Pruritus

Fifth disease (i.e., erythema infectiosum)*

Miliaria rubra (i.e., prickly heat, heat rash)

Psoriasis (plaque psoriasis)

Rocky Mountain spotted fever*

Roseola (i.e., exanthem subitum, sixth disease)

Toxic epidermal necrolysis*

Toxic shock syndrome (late)*

Viral exanthem, nonspecific

Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome*

note : Table includes all common rashes and all rashes that can have serious consequences for the patient or pregnant contacts of the patient (designated by *) .

HIV = human immunodeficiency virus .

Generalized Rash: Conditions Associated with Pruritus

Fifth disease (i.e., erythema infectiosum)*

Miliaria rubra (i.e., prickly heat, heat rash)

Psoriasis (plaque psoriasis)

Rocky Mountain spotted fever*

Roseola (i.e., exanthem subitum, sixth disease)

Toxic epidermal necrolysis*

Toxic shock syndrome (late)*

Viral exanthem, nonspecific

Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome*

note : Table includes all common rashes and all rashes that can have serious consequences for the patient or pregnant contacts of the patient (designated by *) .

HIV = human immunodeficiency virus .

Systemic symptoms, especially fever, can help narrow the differential diagnosis.3 , 4 Rashes accompanied by fever are most commonly associated with infections, but drug eruptions and rheumatologic diseases can also cause fever. Although most maculopapular rashes that are associated with fever are caused by self-limited viral infections, empiric antibiotics and laboratory testing are indicated when the history, geography, demographics, and systemic manifestations suggest a more serious infection (e.g., meningococcemia, Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever). Petechial rashes require immediate decisions about empiric antibiotics, but life-threatening infections characterized by petechiae (e.g., meningococcemia, Rocky Mountain spotted fever) can start as nonspecific maculopapular rashes.5

PHYSICAL EXAMINATION

Characteristics of the rash itself can help narrow the differential diagnosis. In dermatologic diagnosis, it is often helpful to focus on the clinical appearance of the rash after determining the patient's primary symptom, but before taking a more focused history.6 This approach may not be intuitive to primary care physicians, who would normally take a complete history first and then perform a physical examination. The size of individual lesions can vary from pinpoint to total-body redness (i.e., erythroderma Table 3 ). The shape of individual lesions and their tendency to cluster can also provide important clues. For example, linear patterns of erythema or vesicles are typical of poison ivy oval lesions are typical of pityriasis rosea round lesions are typical of nummular eczema annular lesions are typical of tinea corporis and geometric patterns may imply a contact component. The color of the lesions should also be noted. Although most generalized rashes are pink or red, lichen planus is characterized by violaceous lesions, and secondary syphilis by red-brown lesions.

Generalized Rash: Conditions Suggested by Size of Lesions

Miliaria rubra (i.e., prickly heat, heat rash)

Rocky Mountain spotted fever*

Roseola (i.e., exanthem subitum, sixth disease)

Fifth disease (i.e., erythema infectiosum)*

Psoriasis (plaque psoriasis)

Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome*

Toxic epidermal necrolysis*

Viral exanthem, nonspecific

Psoriasis (plaque psoriasis)

Sézary syndrome (i.e., chronic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma)

note : Table includes all common rashes and all rashes that can have serious consequences for the patient or pregnant contacts of the patient (designated by *) .

HIV = human immunodeficiency virus .

†— Some insect bites may be larger than 1 cm .

Generalized Rash: Conditions Suggested by Size of Lesions

Miliaria rubra (i.e., prickly heat, heat rash)

Rocky Mountain spotted fever*

Roseola (i.e., exanthem subitum, sixth disease)

Fifth disease (i.e., erythema infectiosum)*

Psoriasis (plaque psoriasis)

Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome*

Toxic epidermal necrolysis*

Viral exanthem, nonspecific

Psoriasis (plaque psoriasis)

Sézary syndrome (i.e., chronic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma)

note : Table includes all common rashes and all rashes that can have serious consequences for the patient or pregnant contacts of the patient (designated by *) .

HIV = human immunodeficiency virus .

†— Some insect bites may be larger than 1 cm .

In addition to the rash itself, the physician should evaluate the patient's lymph nodes, neurologic status, body temperature, and general appearance. Patients with fever and toxic appearance require prompt evaluation and possibly empiric treatment before reaching a definitive diagnosis.

Dermatologic Signs . Several dermatologic signs may help narrow the differential diagnosis. For example, the Koebner phenomenon (i.e., development of typical lesions at the site of trauma) is characteristic of psoriasis and lichen planus.7 The Nikolsky sign (i.e., easy separation of the epidermis from the dermis with lateral pressure) is associated with staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis.8 The value of the Auspitz sign (i.e., the appearance of bleeding points when scale is removed from psoriatic lesions) in the diagnosis of patients with psoriasis has been questioned because of its low sensitivity and specificity.9 Blanching of erythematous lesions with brief downward pressure implies that the erythema is the result of vasodilation rather than dermal hemorrhage. Blanching is characteristic of drug eruptions, viral exanthems, Kawasaki disease, roseola, and scarlet fever, whereas the lesions of meningococcemia and the late petechial stage of Rocky Mountain spotted fever do not blanch. The physician should note the presence and quality of scale (e.g., psoriasis, tinea corporis, pityriasis rosea) whether the lesions are evanescent (e.g., urticaria) or stable (e.g., erythema multiforme) and whether lesions tend to become confluent (e.g., urticaria) or remain discrete (e.g., insect bites). When atopic dermatitis is considered, the physician should search for other signs of atopy, such as palmar hyper-linearity, infraorbital folds (Dennie-Morgan lines), dry skin, and lichenification.10 , 11

Rash Location . Many rashes tend to avoid or favor certain regions of the body. Physicians should note whether the rash involves the palms, soles, mucous membranes, face, scalp, or extensor or flexor surfaces of extremities. For example, psoriasis usually does not involve the central face, and many generalized rashes avoid the palms and soles, whereas secondary syphilis, erythema multiforme, and rickettsial infections typically include the palms and soles (Table 4) . Keratosis pilaris commonly involves the posterolateral upper arms. Scabies involves the fingers, finger webs, wrists, elbows, knees, groin, buttocks, penis, axillae, belt line, ankles, and feet. Seborrheic dermatitis most often involves the scalp margins, the area behind the ears, external ear canals, base of eyelashes, eyebrows, nasolabial folds, and central chest. Patients should be asked where the rash first appeared, because some rashes have a characteristic progression. For example, pityriasis rosea often starts with a relatively large herald patch on the trunk or proximal extremity several days before the smaller oval lesions appear. Rocky Mountain spotted fever often starts on the wrists and ankles before spreading centrally.5

Generalized Rash: Involvement of Palms and Soles

Contact dermatitis Erythema multiforme Kawasaki disease* Rocky Mountain spotted fever* Rubella* Scabies (in infants) Secondary syphilis* Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome* Stevens-Johnson syndrome* Tinea corporis Toxic epidermal necrolysis* Toxic shock syndrome*

Atopic dermatitis Drug eruption* HIV acute exanthem* Lichen planus Meningococcemia* Psoriasis (plaque psoriasis) Urticaria (i.e., hives)

Fifth disease (i.e., erythema infectiosum)* Folliculitis Guttate psoriasis Insect bites Keratosis pilaris Lyme disease* Miliaria rubra (i.e., prickly heat, heat rash) Nummular eczema Pityriasis rosea Roseola (i.e., exanthem subitum, sixth disease) Scarlet fever*† Seborrheic dermatitis Varicella* Viral exanthem, nonspecific

note : Table includes all common rashes and all rashes that, if left untreated, can have serious consequences for the patient or pregnant contacts of the patient (designated by *) .

HIV = human immunodeficiency virus .

†— Palms and soles can desquamate .

Generalized Rash: Involvement of Palms and Soles

Contact dermatitis Erythema multiforme Kawasaki disease* Rocky Mountain spotted fever* Rubella* Scabies (in infants) Secondary syphilis* Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome* Stevens-Johnson syndrome* Tinea corporis Toxic epidermal necrolysis* Toxic shock syndrome*

Atopic dermatitis Drug eruption* HIV acute exanthem* Lichen planus Meningococcemia* Psoriasis (plaque psoriasis) Urticaria (i.e., hives)

Fifth disease (i.e., erythema infectiosum)* Folliculitis Guttate psoriasis Insect bites Keratosis pilaris Lyme disease* Miliaria rubra (i.e., prickly heat, heat rash) Nummular eczema Pityriasis rosea Roseola (i.e., exanthem subitum, sixth disease) Scarlet fever*† Seborrheic dermatitis Varicella* Viral exanthem, nonspecific

note : Table includes all common rashes and all rashes that, if left untreated, can have serious consequences for the patient or pregnant contacts of the patient (designated by *) .

HIV = human immunodeficiency virus .

†— Palms and soles can desquamate .

TESTS

Blood tests that may be helpful include a complete blood count to determine the presence of leukocytosis or thrombocytopenia, and serologic studies to identify various infectious causes. Mineral oil mounts and potassium hydroxide scrapings can be helpful when scabies or dermatophytes are considered. Skin biopsy, with or without direct or indirect immunofluorescence, is often helpful, especially to confirm lichen planus, dermatitis herpetiformis, mycosis fungoides, and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome.12


9 King Edmund II Of England

King Edmund II (nicknamed Edmund Ironside) was king of England for just seven months in 1016. He raised an army to fend off invasions by the Danish invader Canute (aka Cnut the Great). However, after a siege in London, Edmund was finally defeated. At the Treaty of Alney, Canute allowed Edmund to retain lands in Wessex in return for a peace agreement.

Not long after that, Edmund passed away. Some say he died of natural causes. However, Henry of Huntingdon&rsquos account of Edmund&rsquos death states that when Edmund answered the call of nature, he was stabbed twice from below by an assassin concealed in the pit beneath the toilet seat. The assassin left the knife, which had ruptured Edmund&rsquos bowel, protruding from the king&rsquos rear end while he made his escape. [2]


Did Elizabeth Woodville, England’s ‘White Queen,’ Die of the Plague?

When Elizabeth Woodville died in 1492, she was buried with little of the pomp and circumstance befitting a woman of her rank. Despite the fact that she was Edward IV's queen consort, mother of the missing princes in the tower—Edward, Prince of Wales, and his younger brother Richard, Duke of York—and grandmother of Henry VIII, just five attendants transported her casket down the Thames River to Windsor Castle. Here, Elizabeth's arrival was met with silence rather than the typical tolling of bells. Soon after, the “White Queen” of England, so-called for her links with the royal House of York, as represented by the emblem of the white rose, was buried without receiving any of the traditional funerary rites.

As Alison Flood reports for the Guardian, a 500-year-old letter recently unearthed in England’s National Archives may hold the key to understanding the muted affair. Written by Andrea Badoer, the Venetian ambassador to London, in 1511, the missive states, “The Queen-Widow, mother of King Edward, has died of plague, and the King is disturbed.”

Based on context clues, records specialist Euan Roger tells Flood it seems likely that the queen in question was Elizabeth. If Roger’s theory is correct, as he argues in a new study published in the Social History of Medicine, the letter would account for not only the dowager queen’s simple funeral (given fear of contagion, plague victims were often buried quickly and without ceremony), but also the Tudor king’s exaggerated, lifelong fear of plague and other deadly illnesses.

Elizabeth of York, oldest daughter of Elizabeth Woodville and Edward IV, married Henry VII, uniting the warring houses of York and Lancaster (Public domain)

According to Flood, Badoer’s note is the only near-contemporary record to identify Elizabeth’s cause of death. Previously, most historians had attributed the modest burial ceremony to the queen’s own wishes, as she reportedly requested a funeral “without pompes entring or costlie expensis donne thereabout.”

This explanation makes sense in light of the fact that Elizabeth spent the last years of her life in relative isolation at Bermondsey Abbey. It also provides a reason for why she was buried immediately upon her arrival at Windsor instead of being laid out in the chapel for several days.

Given the gap in time between Elizabeth’s 1492 death and Badoer’s 1511 letter, Roger suggests Badoer’s account served as a reflection on how Henry’s personal history affected his emotional state rather than a record of current events. In 1511, the Tudor king was young and hopeful of his dynasty’s future—another 20 years would pass before Henry divorced his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, in favor of the younger, and presumably more fertile, Anne Boleyn—but he still had no heir, raising concern for what would happen in the event of his untimely demise.

Fear of disease was a recurring theme in Henry’s life: As Erin Blakemore explains for History.com, the king spent his summers moving between various country houses, eager to escape the seasonal illnesses sweeping through the country’s capital. Plague was a key concern, as was the sweating sickness, a mysterious affliction that found its victims “well today and dead tomorrow,” in the words of the Conversation’s Derek Gatherer. Known to cause a cold sweat, fever, heart palpitations and dehydration, the sweat killed between 30 to 50 percent of those struck with the illness in just 3 to 18 hours. Interestingly, Gatherer points out, the sweat—widely rumored to have arrived in England with Henry VII’s band of foreign mercenaries in 1485—had died out by the late Elizabethan era and remains poorly understood to this day.

Elizabeth's grandson, Henry VIII, depicted in 1509, the year of his ascension to the English throne (Public domain)

While Henry never contracted the plague or the sweat, thousands of his subjects were not so lucky. If Roger’s hypothesis proves true, the king’s own grandmother was among them.

According to popular legend, Elizabeth Woodville first caught Edward IV’s attention while waiting under an oak tree in hopes of convincing the passing king to restore her sons’ inheritance. Known then as Lady Elizabeth Grey, she had been widowed by the Wars of the Roses, an ongoing dynastic clash between two branches of the royal Plantagenet family. Regardless of how the pair truly met, it's clear that her renowned beauty immediately appealed to the notoriously lascivious young Yorkist. The couple wed secretly in 1464, thwarting advisors’ hopes of negotiating a diplomatically advantageous marriage and attracting the ire of virtually everyone at court aside from the newly elevated Woodville faction.

The remainder of Elizabeth’s life was marked by a series of power struggles. At one point, Edward briefly lost the throne, which was subsequently reclaimed by the Lancastrian Henry VI, and upon the Yorkist king’s death, his brother, Richard III, seized power by declaring his nephews illegitimate. During an early coup, Edward’s former ally and mentor also ordered the executions of Elizabeth’s father and brother. And, of course, at some point during Richard’s reign, her sons, the unlucky “princes in the tower,” vanished without a trace. Still, the end of the 30-year conflict found Elizabeth in a position of relative victory: She negotiated the marriage of her daughter, Elizabeth of York, to Henry VII, forging peace between the warring houses before her death by uniting the white rose of York with the red rose of Lancaster.


U.S.S San Diego (CL-53)

Access
Collection is open for research.

Acquisition Information
The collection was received by the Maritime Museum of San Diego in 2005.

Historical Note
The U.S.S. San Diego (CL-53) was the second U.S. Navy ship to bear the California citys name. The Atlanta-class light antiaircraft cruiser, commissioned in 1942, played a part in almost every major Pacific campaign during World War II. Although it was attacked on numerous occasions, the San Diego never lost a man in combat or suffered any major damage. During its lifetime, the ship participated in 34 major battles, earned 18 battle stars, and traveled 300,000 miles. On August 28, 1945, it earned the distinction of being among the first major Allied warships to enter Tokyo Bay since the beginning of the war. The San Diego was decommisioned in November 1946 and placed in the Pacific Reserve Fleet in Bremerton, Washington. It was redesignated CLAA-53 in 1949, was struck from the Naval Vessel Register 10 years later, and was scrapped in Seattle in 1960.

Scope and Content
The U.S.S. San Diego collection is a compilation of historical pieces and the results of research undertaken by members of the U.S.S. San Diego Reunion Association. It contains a number of original and photocopied logs and records from the San Diego and one of its captains, W.E.A. Mullan. In addition to this official record, the collection offers a number of firsthand accounts told by those who served aboard the ship. Diaries, correspondence, biographies, pre-written crew letters, and memorabilia illustrate the activities of the ship and the daily lives of its crew.

Also detailing the San Diegos history are numerous manuscripts and clippings, spanning from the World War II era to the early 21st century. The collection also contains information about the first U.S.S. San Diego (ACR-6) and the third (AFS-6), as well as general background information about World War II and ships of the United States Navy.

Organization and Arrangement
The collection is arranged into the following series:
I. Ships Activities and Crew Experiences
II. Records and Logs
III. Manuscripts
IV. Clippings and Publications
V. Military Ships Reference Material
VI. General World War II Reference Material

Container List
Series I – Ships Activities and Crew Experiences
141.1
U.S.S. San Diego background
History and specifications
Battle record and significant events
Personnel
Images

141.2
History of the U.S.S. San Diego (CL-53) from 10 January 1942 to 3 December 1945

141.3
Diary – Earl R. Burton, Saga of a Fighting Ship (1942-1944)

141.4
Diary – Martin Levine, Set Condition One (1943-1946)

141.5
Diary – New Caledonia 1943
Diary – My Cruise Aboard the San Diego (9/14/1943 – 9/2/1945)
Log of John J. Micho (10/1942 – 6/1944)

141.6
Crew Stories and Memories

141.7
Biographies of USS San Diego Shipmates

141.8
Ronald Reagan letter to U.S.S. San Diego crew, with signature (4/25/1986)

141.9
Official Correspondence (10/30/1944 – 10/20/1945, n.d.)

141.10
W.E. Mullan letter to his wife (8/30/1945)

141.11
U.S.S. San Diego Memorial Association correspondence re: San Diego crew (4/30/1985 – 8/17/2004)
Research/interview notes

141.12
U.S.S. San Diego Memorial Association correspondence re: San Diego crew (4/24/1985 – 2/17/2005)
Research/interview notes

141.13
Crew letters (8/13/1944 – 8/21/1945)

141.14
Crew letters (2/21/1945 – 8/21/1945, n.d.)

141.15
Press News (3/13/1942 – 7/2/1943)

141.16
Press News (10/27/1944 – 8/8/1945)

141.17
Press News (8/13/1945 – 9/2/1945)

142.1
Memorabilia/ephemera
Menus (1942)
Map – Town of Noumea
Thanksgiving 1943
Certificates

142.2
Memorabilia/ephemera
Envelopes
Holiday cards/postcards
Program – Leonard E. Shea memorial
Semaphore wheel

142.3
Memorabilia/ephemera
Envelopes

142.5
Ashore in San Diego 1942

142.7
Map of part of Honshu Island, Japan

Series II – Records and Logs
142.8
Deck Logs (Various), Hand-written, 1942

142.10
U.S.S. San Diego (CL-53) Deck Log, 1/10/1942, Listing Plankowners

142.11
Logs (1/10/1942 – 10/30/1945)

142.12
Records and logs (1/10/1942 – 8/27/1945)

142.13
Records and logs (1/30/1942 – 10/26/1945, n.d.)

142.14
Ships records/logs (7/29/1942 – 10/12/1945, n.d.)

142.15
Ships records/logs (8/8/1942 – 10/2/1945, n.d.)

142.16
Deck Logs (Various), Hand-written, 1943

142.17
Deck Logs (Various), Hand-written, 1943

142.18
Deck Logs (Various), Hand-written, 1943

142.20
Logs (12/1/1943 – 1/2/1944)

142.21
Original Deck Logs – 1/3/1945 – 5/31/1945

143.1
U.S.S. San Diego Deck Logs (Various), Typed

143.2
U.S.S. San Diego Deck Logs (Various), Typed

143.3
Ships Company log (1942 – 1945)

143.4
Ships Company log (1942 – 1945)

143.5
Orders of the Day (1/10/1942 – 9/7/1945)

143.6
Disciplinary Action, Injury Sheets, Transfer Sheets, Meritorious Mast (1/1945 – 12/1945)

143.7
Names Mentioned in F.I.
Ships Company – Post-war Crew (1945)
Report of Action – 10/26/1942
Passengers on U.S.S. San Diego
Fuel Oil Received
Assignment to Quarters

143.8
Wm. E. Mullan – Orders to take command of the U.S.S. San Diego CL-53 (5/5/1944 – 7/13/1944)

143.9
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records (1/2/1915 – 4/9/1935)

143.10
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records (6/2/1919 – 9/1/1941)

143.11
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records (6/2/1919 – 9/1/1941)

143.12
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records, R-14 (12/27/1927 – 9/23/1936)

143.13
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records, 00/W.E. Mullan (2/25/1929 – 5/1/1933)

143.14
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records – Personal – Vol. I (7/17/1936 – 12/31/1940)

144.1
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records – Personal – Vol. IV (1/3/1938 – 4/17/1941)

144.2
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records – Personal – Vol. IV (1/3/1938 – 4/17/1941)

144.3
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records – Captains Office – Do Not Remove (5/29/1941 – 6/15/1944)

144.4
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records – Captains Office – Do Not Remove (5/29/1941 – 6/15/1944)

144.5
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records – Captain Mullan (4/1/1944 – 12/22/1945)

144.6
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records – Captain Mullan (4/1/1944 – 12/22/1945)

144.7
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records – Separation Papers and Retirement (9/16/1946 – 7/27/1950)

144.8
W.E.A. Mullan Service Records – September Daily Report (n.d.)
List of U.S.S. Vincennes Officers On Board U.S.S. Barnett
Survivors of U.S.S. Vincennes Aboard U.S.S. Hunter Liggett

144.9
Documents From the Personal Service File of Radm. William A.E. Mullan

145.1
Muster Roll of the Crew, 1/1942 – 3/1942

145.2
Muster Roll of the Crew, 4/1942 – 6/1942

145.3
Muster Roll of the Crew, 7/1942 – 9/1942

145.4
Muster Roll of the Crew, 10/1942 – 12/1942

145.5
Muster Roll of the Crew, 1/1943 – 3/1943

145.6
Muster Roll of the Crew, 4/1943 – 6/1943

145.7
Muster Roll of the Crew, 7/1943 – 9/1943

145.8
Muster Roll of the Crew, 10/1943 – 12/1943

145.9
Muster Roll of the Crew, 1/1944 – 3/1944

146.1
Muster Roll of the Crew, 4/1944 – 6/1944

146.2
Muster Roll of the Crew, 7/1944 – 9/1944

146.3
Muster Roll of the Crew, 10/1944 – 12/1944

146.4
Muster Roll of the Crew, 1/1945 – 3/1945

146.5
Muster Roll of the Crew, 4/1945 – 6/1945

146.6
Muster Roll of the Crew, 7/1945 – 9/1945

146.7
Muster Roll of the Crew, 11/1945 – 1/1946

Series III – Manucripts

146.8
Manuscripts
World War II went out with two stupendous, thundering booms¦
U.S.S. San Diego: First Capital Ship into Tokyo Bay: Aug. 1945
A Proud Tribute to San Diegos Namesake Ship

— remaining items from Manuscripts series in Boxes 149 and 150

Series IV -Clippings and Publications
146.9
Clippings – San Diego Union, Navy Day Section, 10/27/1945

146.10
Clippings, newspaper (11/19/1940 – 6/20/1960)

146.11
Clippings, newspaper, WWII era (n.d.)

146.12
Clippings, newspaper (9/12/1991 – 6/6/2004, n.d.)

147.1
Clippings, magazine (12/16/1944 – 6/15/2002, n.d.)

147.2
Clippings, Sea Classics magazine (n.d.)

147.3
Clipping / Correspondence refuting claim that San Diego was first into Tokyo Bay
The Silent Defenders: First Ship into Tokyo Bay

Series V – Military Ships Reference Material
147.4
AFS-6 U.S.S. San Diego

147.5
U.S.S. Hornet, U.S.S. Mustin DD-413

147.8
U.S.S. Midway CV-41
Noumea New Caledonia
HMS Victorious

147.12
Miscellaneous military ships

Series VI – General World War II Reference Material
148.1
Reference material – U.S. Navy and World War II
Glossary of Naval Words and Phrases
Anti-Aircraft Cruiser: The Life of a Class by Norman Friedman
Battle Report: Victory in the Pacific, 1949

148.2
Deaths (World War II casualties)

148.3
Deaths (World War II casualties)

148.4
Deaths (World War II casualties)

148.5
Deaths (World War II casualties)

148.6
Transpac Pictures and Papers for Museum (World War II era patrol squadrons)

148.7
Transpac Pictures and Papers for Museum (World War II era patrol squadrons)

148.8
Transpac Pictures and Papers for Museum (World War II era patrol squadrons)

148.9
Transpac Pictures and Papers for Museum (World War II era patrol squadrons)

148.10
Transpac Pictures and Papers for Museum (World War II era patrol squadrons)

148.11
Lt. Comdr. G.P. Biggs telegram to Vice Admiral William Halsey
Instrument of Surrender (copy) (9/2/1942)

148.12
Handbook of Maintenance Instructions for Radio Receivers (2/25/1942)

148.13
Sheet Music – Anchors Aweigh!

Telegram of Admiral Nimitz

Telegram of Admiral Halsey

Manuscripts
149.1
My Cruise Aboard the San Diego, author unknown.

149.2
U.S.S. San Diego: First Fighting Ship Into Tokyo Bay by Robert Alderson.

149.3
Untitled letter by William Mullan to the Mayor of San Diego (9/10/1945)

149.4
The Travels and Adventures of the Good Ship San Juan, CL-54, 1942-1946 by Tom Falloon.

149.5
Action Report. 10/26/1942

149.6
Action Report. 8/19/1945 – 9/8/1945

149.7
History of the U.S.S. San Diego from 10 January 1942 to 3 December 1945, written at the request of the Secretary of the Navy.

149.8
At Sea – Western Pacific – mimeographed news sheets to be mailed home.

149.9
Mimeographed letters to be mailed home by crewmen.

149.10
Aboard the U.S.S. San Diego, Tokyo Bay. Intended to be sent to hometown newspapers.

149.11
Press News – April 14, 1945.

149.12
New Atomic Bomb Has Power of 20,000 Tons of T.N.T. Associated Press report.

149.13
Cruiser San Diego Anchors 300 Yards off Yokosuka Base, clippings, photographs, records.

149.14
The Five Incher. 12/16/1944

149.15
Ships Named San Diego. 12/18/1967

149.16
Under the Cold Gaze of the Victorious by Robert B. Carney. Proceedings, U.S. Naval Institute, December 1983.

149.17
Enemies No More by Ben W. Blee. Proceedings, U.S. Naval Institute, February 1987.

149.18
Landing at Tokyo Bay by Vernon C. Squires. American Heritage, August/September 1985.

149.19
Liberty Town, World War II by Roberta Ridgely. San Diego Magazine, December 1988.

149.20
The Chicago Piano by Konrad F. Schreier, Jr. Naval History, July/August 1994.

150.1
U.S.S. San Diego: The Unbeatable Ship That Nobody Ever Heard Of by Fred Whitmore. Mainsl Haul, Vol. 33, No. 2, Spring 1997.

150.2
Savo Island: The Worst Defeat by George William Kittredge. Naval History, August 2002.

150.3
The U.S.S. San Diego and the California Naval Militia by George J. Albert, California Center for Military History, 10/20/2004.

150.4
U.S.S. San Diego (CL-53, later CLAA-53), 1942-1960. Department of the Navy – Naval Historical Center, n.d.

150.5
Chronological Record of the U.S.S. San Diego CL-53 by Spence Ehrman, n.d.

150.6
How the Navy Names Its Ships by John D.H. Kane, Jr., n.d.

150.7
History of the U.S.S. San Diego (CL 53). Office of Naval Records and History, n.d.

150.8
Attack, Repeat – Attack! by Remo Salta, n.d.

150.9
The Battle for Guadalcanal, November 12-15, 1942: The Big Turn From Defensive to Aggressive Action by Fred Whitmore, n.d.

150.10
Typhoon by Fred Whitmore, n.d.

150.11
U.S.S. San Diego: The Unbeatable Ship That Nobody Ever Heard Of by Fred Whitmore. U.S.S. San Diego Memorial Association, n.d.

150.12
U.S.S. San Diego CL-53: ˜A Monument to Freedom by Fred Whitmore, n.d.

150.13
Atlanta Class. From Cruisers of World War Two: An International Encyclopedia by M.J. Whitley.

150.14
Occupation of Yokosuka. From History of the Sixth Marine Division.

150.15
The Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, 26-27 October 1942 From The Struggle for Guadalcanal.

150.16
Atlanta Class. From U.S. Light Cruisers in Action, Warships Number 12, Squadron/Signal Publications.

150.17
U.S.S. San Diego – San Diego Visit – October 26-30, 1945 booklet.

150.18
Summary of War Damage to U.S. Battleships, Carriers, Cruisers, Destroyers and Destroyer Escorts. 10/17/1941 – 12/7/1942

Oversized Items
151.1
Deck logs (1/1945 – 12/1945)

151.2
Deck logs (1/1946 – 11/1946)

151.3
Original Five-Incher newsletters, 1944

151.4
Original Five-Incher newsletters, 1945

151.5
Original check logs
#606 (8/1/1942) – #3455 (5/10/1943)

151.6
Clipping – Fleet on Move to Tokio Bay

151.7
Clipping – Battleship Missouri leads naval parade for surrender of Mikado

151.8
Map – N. Philippines / Formosa / Japan, showing ships track into Tokyo Bay (7/2/1945 – 8/29/1945)

151.9
Newspaper – San Diego Tribune-Sun Saturday, October 27, 1945 Home Edition

151.10
Newspaper – San Diego Tribune-Sun Saturday, October 27, 1945 with Navy Day Section

151.11
Newspaper – San Diego Union Saturday, October 27, 1945 Navy Day Section

151.12
Newspaper – San Diego Union Saturday, October 27, 1945 photocopy


Rev. Dr. William Wilson

He was also said to have married Isabel Woodhall about 1575.

"Arms of 'Wil'm Wilsonn, of Welborne, per Norroy flower, 1586.'

Per pale argent and azure three lions' gambs barways, erased and counterchanged.

Crest: - A lion's head erased argent guttee de sand.

Harleian Coll., No. 1550, Fol. 192, British Museum Richard Mundy's copy of the Visitations of LIncolnshire, 1564 adn 1592."

"The Wilson arms (Harleian Manuscript 1507):

A confirmacon of ye Armes & guifte of ye Crest of Wm Wilson of Welborne in ye County of Lincolne son of William Wilson of ye Town of Perith [i.e. Penrith] in ye County of Cumber And to allhis issue & offspring for ever under ye hand & seale of Wm Flower alias Clarenc. king of Armes Dated ye 24 of March 1586 ye 19th of Queen Elizabeth.

Now 1594 Barneby Wilson of ye prebends of wildsor sonn of ye Aforesd Wm Wilson of Wilborne.

Arms: Per pale argent and azure, three lions gambs erased fessways in pale counterchanged.

Crest: A lion's head argent guttee de sang." Photo on file

"William Wilson was Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Prebendary of Rochester, Rector of Cliffe, near Rochester, etc. and for 32 years, Prebendary of St. George's Chapel at Windsor where he was buried."

"He was educated at Merton College, Oxford which he left in 1575 on his acceptance of a living from the Earl of Pembroke. . .He became Prebendary of Saint Paul's and Rochester Cathedrals, and held the rectory of Cliffe, Kent. In 1584 he became a Canon of Windsor in place of Dr. William Wickham."

"He was a Prebendary of St. Paul's and Rochester Cahtedral, and also rector of Cliffe, Kent. He was chaplain of Archbishop Grindall of Canterbury, and was made Canon of Windsor in 1584. He married Isabel, daughter of John and Elizabeth Woodhall of Walden, Essex, a niece of Bishop Grindall. He died in 1615, and was buried next his father at Windsor."

"Rev. William Wilson, D.D., of Merton College, Oxford, was also a prebendary of st. Paul's and Rochester cathedrals, and held the rectory of cliffe, in the county of Kent. In 1584 he became canon of Windsor in place of dr. Will. Wickham promoted to the see of Lincoln, being about that time chaplain to Edmund (Grindall), Archbishop of Canterbury. He married Isabel Woodhall, daughter of John and Elizabeth Woodhall of Walden in Essex, and niece of Archbishop Grindall. He was buried in St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, near the body of his father, William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, in Lincolnshire, Gent.",

With Isabel he had six sons and six daughters.

He was "Rev. William Wilson, D.D., Canon of Windsor."

"John Wilkinson, of London, gentleman, 3 May, 1614, . .. I do give and bequeath unto the Right Worshipfull my lving uncle William Wilson, Doctor of Divinity, five pounds and to every one of my loving cosens, his children, twenty shillings apiece."

"Dame Mary Rowe, widow of Sir Thomas Row, Knight, late citizen and alderman of London . . by her will of 21 March, 1579, proved in the year 1582-3, bequeathed to William Wilsonn, parson of Cliff, als Clyve, in Kent, a ring of gold, or three pounds or three pounds in money, and to his wife a ring of gold or its equivilent in money. Rowe, 1."

"He made his will on 23 August 1613, then, two years later, apparently sick and expecting to die, he added two codicils and died a few days later on 15 May 1615, aged 73. He was buried in the chael of Saint George by Windsor Casle as was his father. On the north side was a grave stone on which, in brass plates, was the figure of a man and this inscription. It is now gone. The inscription to his memory, now gone, was:" Inscription and will to be entered.

"Rev. William Wilson, in his will proved 27 May, 1615, mentions his godson William Sheafe when twenty-one and in the codicil he mentions his son-in-law Mr. Dr. Thomas Sheafe."

"two of New England's greatest Divines, Hooker and Wilson, the latter of them, says Cotton Mather, 'having for his mother a niece of Dr. Edmund Grindal' and the same veracious chronicler makes honorable mention, in his life of Wilson, of the 'good kinsman of his, who deserves to live in the same story, as he now lives in the same Heaven, with him, namely, Mr. Edward Rawson, the honored Secretary of the Massachuset Colony.' "

"William Wilson was educated at Merton College, Oxford, was prebendary of St. Paul's and Rochester Cathedral, Rector of Cliffe, Kent, and in 1584 became Canon of Windsor. He and his wife Anne's wills are printed in Henry F. Waters, Genealogical Gleanings in England (Boston, 1901), 1:54, 55, 1397. Elias Ashmole in History and Antiquities of Berkshire (Reading, 1736) recorded monumental inscriptions to them once located in St. George's Chapel but now lost. The shielf of arms to him and his wife, however, is still extant. the illustration below is from a rubbing [photo on file] "

"Rev. William Wilson, D.D., 'prebend of St. Paul's, of Richester and of Windsor, and rector of Cliff [-at-Hoo, Kent], with his wife Isabel Woodhall, a niece of Edmunc Grindal, Archbishop of Canterbury. Rev. William Wilson, the father, was in contact with Henry Hastings, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon (the patron of John Mansfield) as shown by a surviving letter from Rev. Wilson to the Earl. As previous writers have been unaware of the Wilson-Huntingdon connection, it may be helpful to print the abstract of this letter.

'1592/3], Jan. 29. Windsor. - I have made the abstract of the chantries of Windsor Chapel plainer and send than to you. It seems your chantry was appointed by the will of William, Lord Hastings, but was not perfected till after his death, by Dme Katheren, his wife, and his son Edward, Lord Hastings and Hungerford, which was the cause of the error in the abstract exhibited to you on Saturday last. I pray your purpose and our desires may take effect. Mr. Dean and my brethren have sent the late Lord Chancellor's robe by the bringer hereof, Mr. Wulward, one of our brethren, for your to see. If you like it, please send word what you will give for it. Endorsed: 'Wylson, a prebendary of Wynsor, J. 29.' "

"The career of William Wilson, D.D., appointed Canon of St. George's, Windsor 10 Dec. 1584, is related in S.L. Ollard, Fasti Wyndesorienses: The Deans and Canons of Windsor (Historical Monographs Relating to St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, 8), 76. He was born 1545, attended Merton College, oxford (Fellow 1565, B.A. 1564, M.A. 1570, B.D. 1576, D.D. 1607), rector of Islip, do. Oxford, 1578, Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Prebendary of Rochester [Kent] 1591, 1614, Rector of Cliffe [near Rochester], Chancellor of St. Paul's 1596-1615, died 15 May 1615, and was buried in St. George's Chapel near his father (there was a monumental inscription (now lost) to his father, William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, co. Lincoln., gentleman, who died at Windsor Castle 27 Aug. 1587]). The sketch of Edmund Wilson, M.D. (1583-1616) is given in the same source. The endorsement - 'Wylson, a prebendary of Wynsor' - identifies the writer of this letter as Rev. William Wilson, the father of Rev. John Wilson. Mather states that Rev. William Wilson was 'a prebend of . . . Windsor,' and William's brass in St. George's, Windsor, also calls him 'Prebendarie of this Church.' The contact between William Wilson and the Earl of Huntingdon may indicate that they shared similar Puritan (or Proto-Puritan) religious views, although in this instance they were discussing the distinctly un-Puritan matter of a chantry. The marriage of John Wilson, a great-nephew of the Archbishop of Canterbury, into the family of one of Huntingdon's gentlemen, is not terribly unusual. Wilson's father has been called 'a man of deep erudition, a scholar and a courtier . . . we must suppose him to have been a persona grata in the eyes of Queen Elizabeth.' "

"See J. Garnder Bartlett's article on Wilson, Register [note 99]. William Wilson, John Mansfield, John Ewry alias Every [Eure] and William Vessey ere defendants in Chancery concerning woods called 'Byrkell,' 'Rigg,' 'Bentley Park,' land in Walington and Bentley, parcel of the manor of Bentley, Yorks., 42 Elizabeth I [PRO E134/42Eliz/East8)."

"William Wilson, Canon of St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle August, 1613, proved 27 May, 1615. To be buried in the chapel near the plsace where the body of my dear father lies. If I die at Rochester or in the County of Kent, then to be buried in the cathedral church of Rochester, near the bodies of wives Isabel and Anne. To my cousin College prebendary at Rochester. To the Fellows and scholars of Martin College, Oxford. My three sons Edmond, John and Thomas Wilson, daughter Isabel Guibs and daughter Margaret Rawson. My goddaughter Margaret Somers which my son Somers had by my daughter Elizabeth, late wife. To my god-son William Sheafe, at the age of twenty one ye Son Edmund, a fellow of King's College, Cambridge, eldest son of me, said William. To son John the lease of the Rectory and Parsonage Caxton in the County of Cambridge, which I have taken in his name. Thomas Wilson, my third son. Son Edmond to be executor and Mr Erasmus Webb, my brother-in-law, being one of the Canons of St. George Chapel, and my brother, Mr. Thomas Woodward, being steward of the town of New Windsor, to be overseers.

The witnesses were Thomas Woodwarde, Joh. Woodwarde, Robert Lower & thomas Holl.

In a codicil, dated 9 May, 1615, wherein he is styled William Wilson Doctor of Divinity, he directs his son Edmond to give to his son John forty pounds and to his wife forty marks, he gives to Lincoln College Oxford ten pounds toward a Library, and mentions son-in-law Mr Doctor Sheafe and daughter Gibbes. to this Thomas Sheafe was a witness, among others.

In another codicil, of 12 May, 1615, he says, I have provided for the husband of my daughter Isabel Givves a place in Windsor, in reversion, of some worth. His signature to this codicil was witnessed by David Rawson and William Newman. Rudd, 36."

"Rev. William Wilson, D.D., of Merton College, Oxford, was also a prebendary of St. Paul's and Rochester cathedrals, and held the rectory of Cliffe, in the county of Kent. In 1584 he became canon of Windsor in place of Dr. Will. Wickham promoted to the see of Lincoln, being about that time chaplain to Edmund (Grindall). Archbishop of Canterbury. He married Isabel Woodhall, daughter of John and Elizabeth Woodhall of Walden in Essex, and niece of Archbishop Grindall. He was buried in St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, near the body of his father, William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, in Lincolnshire, Gent."

"The following notes, taken from the History and Antiquities of Berkshire, by Elias Ashmole, Esq. (Reading, 1736), give the inscriptions found by that famous antiquary in the Chapel of St. George, Windsor Castle, relating to this family.

On the North Side lied a Grave-stone, on which, in Brass Plates, is the Figure of a Man, and this Inscription.

'To me to live is Christ, and to dye is Gain.

Here underneath lied interr'd the Body of William Wilson, Doctour of Divinitie, and Prebendarie of this Church by the space of 32 yeares. He had Issue by Isabell his Wife six sons and six daughters. He dy'd the 15th of May, in the Year of our Lord 1615, of his Age the 73. beloved of all in his Life much lamented in his Death.

Who thinke of Deathe in Lyfe, can never dye,

But mount through Faith, from Earth to heavenly Pleasure,

Weep then no more, though her his Body lye,

His Doul's possest of never ending Treasure.'

On another small Brass Plate, on the same Grave-stone, is the following Inscription.

'Neere unto this Place lyes buried William Willson, the third Son, Who, after a long Trial of grievous Sickness, did comfortably yield up his Spirit in the Yeare of our Lord 1610. of his Age 23.'

On a Brass Plate, on a Grave-Stone Northward of the last, is this Inscripition.

'William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, in the County of Lincolne, Gent. departed this Lyfe, within the castle of Windsor, in the Yeare of our Lord 1587. the 27th Day of August, and lyeth buried in this Place.' P. 309.

Arms of 'Will'm Wilsonn, of Welborne, per Norroy flower, 1586.'

'Per pale argent and azure three lions' gambs barways, erased and counterchanged.

Crest: - A lion's head erased argent guttee de sang.

Harleian Coll., No. 1550, Fol. 192, British Museum: Richard Mundy's copy of the Visitations of Lincolnshire, 1564 and 1592."

"Rev. William Wilson, D.D., born about 1542, graduated at Merton College, Oxford, B.A. 1564, M.A. 1570, B.D. 1576, D.D. 1607 rector of Islip, Oxfordshire, 1578 rector of Cliffe, co. Kent, 1579 rector of Caxton, co. Kent, 1593 prebendary of st. Paul's London, 1595-1615, and of Rochester Cathedral, 1591-1614. About 1580 he became chaplain to Edmund Grindll, Archbishop of Canterbury, and in 1583 became canon of Windsor, holding his position for thirty-two years, until his death May 15, 1615, aged 73, and was buried in the chapel of St. George, Windsor Castle, where a monumental brass to his memory states that he was 'beloved of all in his Life, and much lamented in his Death.' (Alumni Oxoniensis, vol. iv, p. 1657 Ashmole's 'History and Antiquities of Berkshire,' p. 305 Register, ante, vol. xxxviii, pp. 306-308, and vol lii, p. 144.) He married first, about 1575, Isabel, daughter of John Woodhall, Esq., of Walden, co Essex, by Elizabeth his wife, sister of Rev. Edmund Grindall, the celebrated Puritan Archbishop of Canterbury, described by Lord Bacon as 'the gravest and greatest prelate of the land.' (Register, ante, vol. xxxviii, pp. 301-308.) He married second, Anne, sister of REv. Erasmus Webb, canon of Windsor, who died in 1612, without issue. (Register, ante, vol. lii, pp. 143-4.) "

"Dr. William Wilson, a prebend of St. Paul's, of rochester and of Winsor, and rector of Cliffe."

"John Wilkinson, of London, gentleman, 3 May, 1614, acknowledged 27 May, 1628 acknowledged again 18 June, 1634 . . . I do give and bequeath unto the Right Worshipfull my loving uncle William Wilson, Doctor of Divinity, five pounds,, and to every one of my loving cosens, his children, twenty shillings apiece. . . "

"Dame Mary Rowe, widw of Sir Thomas Row, Knight, late citizen and alderman of London . . . by her will of 21 March, 1579, proved int he eyar 1582-3, bequeathed to William Wilsonn, parson of Cliff, als Clyve, in Kent, a ring of gold, of three pounds of three pounds in money, and to his wife a ring of gold or its equivilent in money. Rowe, 1."

Father: William WILSON b: ABT 1515

Marriage 1 Isabel WOODHALL b: ABT 1550

Chaplain to Edmund Grindall, Archbishop of Canterbury

Canon of Windsor Rev. William Wilson. Born ca 1542 at England.116 William died in May 1615.65 Buried on 15 May 1615 in St George's Chapel, Windsor.116 Education: Merton College, Oxford, B.A. 1564, B.D. 1576, D.D. 1607.116 William was prebendary of St Paul's and Rochester Cathedral, Rector of Cliffe, Kent, and in 1584 became Canon of Windsor. From Bartlett:116 William was "rector at Islip, Oxfordshire, 1578 rector of Cliffe, co. Kent, 1579 rector of Caxton, co. Kent, 1593, prebendary of St. Paul's, London, 1595-1615, and of Rochester Cathedral, 1594-1614. About 1580 he became chaplain to Edmund Grindall, Archbishop of Canterbery, and in 1583 became canon of Windsor, holding this position for thirty-two years, until his death May 15, 1615, aged 73, and was buried in the chapel of St. George, Windsor Castle, where a monumental brass to his memory states that he was 'beloved of all in his Life, and much lamented in his Death.'" Ca 1570 William first married Isabel Woodhall (4978) , daughter of John Woodhall Esq (ca 1519-) & Elizabeth Grindall (1341) (ca 1520-bef Apr 1583). Born ca 1546. Isabel died at England bef 1615. Buried in Rochester Cathedral, Kent.65

William Wilson was Prebendary of St. Paul's & Rochester Cathedrals, & Rectory of Cliffe:


The death of Edward II - the Welsh connections

The death of King Edward II of England is a relatively well known story - the time was that every schoolboy in the country would happily tell you he was murdered by having a red-hot poker thrust into a very painful part of his anatomy!

Edward II and Hugh Despenser sought refuge in Caerphilly castle

Whether or not that story is true remains a matter of some conjecture. But what is certainly true is the fact that Wales played a hugely important part in the king's downfall.

On 16 November 1326 Edward and his close friend (and probable lover) Hugh Despenser the Younger were captured by forces loyal to Queen Isabella, the king's own wife, whilst they were making their way from Neath Abbey towards Caerphilly Castle. The story of the king's journey from glory to ignominious failure in south Wales is both tortuous and compelling.

Edward's reign had been nothing short of disastrous. Succeeding his father, Edward I, in 1307, it seemed at first that he had all the kingly attributes.

Tall, strong and physically attractive, he had been born at Caernarfon castle. The story that Edward Longshanks presented his infant son to the Welsh leaders who had demanded a prince who could speak no English is patently untrue, like many of the stories surrounding this most ambiguous of men.

In 1308 he married Isabella of France but almost from the start the marriage was doomed. Edward was probably homosexual, and certainly bisexual. His preference for young men over his queen led him, first, to an intense friendship with Piers Gaveston and then with Hugh Despenser.

Military disasters like defeat in 1314 at the Battle of Bannockburn - arguably the greatest English defeat since the Battle of Hastings - and quarrels with his barons ensured that the king was enormously unpopular and mistrusted, both by the aristocracy and by ordinary people.

However, if the king was unpopular, the autocratic and greedy Despenser family were hated. As the rift between Edward and his queen grew ever wider, it seemed as though the Despensers (Hugh and his father, also called Hugh) became richer and more powerful every day.

Isabella fled to France for a while, returning on 24 September 1326 with her lover and ally Roger de Mortimer in an attempt to sweep Edward from the throne. Her army was small, consisting of barely 1,500 mercenaries, but as she and Mortimer marched on London supporters flocked to her banner and the king realised that he had to leave the city in order to ensure his own safety. He left with the Great Seal of England and something in the region of £30,000.

He fled westwards, towards Wales where Despenser held lands and, more importantly, the powerful fortress of Caerphilly Castle. However, arriving at the inland port of Chepstow, Edward and Despenser decided to take a boat. Whether they were intending to go to Lundy island - another Despenser possession - or to Ireland to gather support is not known. In the event the wind was against them and they spent five days pitching and tossing uselessly in the Bristol Channel.

By now Isabella had issued a proclamation saying that she had come to rid the land of the evil of the Despensers. As a result many Despenser properties were looted or burned and the king and his increasingly desperate friend realised that Caerphilly Castle offered their best chance of survival. Caerphilly was a massive and powerful structure, one that would withstand siege for many months, and it was here that the fugitives first went.

News soon reached them that Bristol Castle, held by the elder Hugh Despenser, had fallen to Isabella's forces and Despenser had been hung. For some strange reason, one that has never been fully explained, Edward and Despenser now left the safety of Caerphilly Castle and rode for Neath Abbey. They arrived on 6 November and remained there for two weeks.

Whether or not Edward thought the religious nature of the house would protect him has never been made clear but from the abbey Edward tried to negotiate peace, sending the abbot and Edward de Boun to his queen to parley and seek a compromise. When the delegates returned with a straightforward message - No! - Edward knew he had to return to the security of Caerphilly Castle.

He and his party had reached Llantrisant when they were surprised by forces led by Henry, Earl of Lancaster. Edward was detained overnight in Llantrisant Castle, already separated from his beloved Hugh Despenser. The end was now in sight.

The king was soon moved to Berkeley Castle across the border in England and was still imprisoned there when the announcement of his Deposition, quickly and easily passed by parliament, was made. His son, Edward III, was proclaimed king in his place on 25 January 1327.

After that the vengeance of Isabella was swift and decisive. Once she had Edward and Hugh Despenser in her power their lives were hanging by a thread and Despenser was quickly condemned. Stripped naked and with messages of hatred scrawled across his body, he was hanged, drawn and quartered. His head was then displayed on London Bridge.

Edward lingered, briefly, in Berkeley Castle. There were two attempts to rescue him by forces loyal to his name but in September 1327 it was announced that he was dead. It has never been totally clear how he died but it is certain that his life was ended on the orders of Queen Isabella.

He may have been strangled, possibly suffocated, but popular opinion will always tend to the view that his death came as a result of a red-hot poker inserted into his anus. Some people say that his screams could be heard for five miles around the castle. It does not bear too much thought.


Cavaliers and pioneers abstracts of Virginia land patents and grants, 1623-1800

Addeddate 2011-12-16 17:35:05 Bookplateleaf 0008 Call number 1547713 Camera Canon EOS 5D Mark II External-identifier urn:oclc:record:1041811662 Foldoutcount 0 Identifier cavalierspioneer00nuge Identifier-ark ark:/13960/t9p27xf8p Ocr ABBYY FineReader 8.0 Openlibrary_edition OL6315441M Openlibrary_work OL4299362W Page-progression lr Pages 852 Possible copyright status Public domain. Published 1923-1963 with notice but no evidence of copyright renewal found in Stanford Copyright Renewal Database. Contact [email protected] for information. Ppi 500 Scandate 20120106202343 Scanner scribe3.il.archive.org Scanningcenter il

This book contains only the original volume of information which only has patents to 1666, NOT 1800, as is in the title.

Secondly, in the description, the listing of the additional volumes without publication dates is misleading, as well. This book was published in 1934 when Nugent first received support for publishing the series, which was withdrawn by the donor just as the second volume was going to press.

An curatorial clarification should be inserted by the staff to correct this problem.

My two star review is for the curatorial information, NOT for the value of Nugent's work, which will always be a five star piece of scholarship. But the search of online text is based upon both the curatorial and the content.


Mục lục

Waller được đặt lườn tại xưởng tàu của hãng Federal Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company ở Kearny, New Jersey vào ngày 12 tháng 2 năm 1942. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 15 tháng 8 năm 1942 được đỡ đầu bởi bà Littleton W. T. Waller, vợ góa Thiếu tướng Waller và nhập biên chế vào ngày 1 tháng 10 năm 1942 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Thiếu tá Hải quân Lawrence H. Frost.

1942 Sửa đổi

Trong mùa Thu năm 1942, Waller tiến hành chạy thử máy ngoài khơi Casco Bay, Maine, đôi khi thực hiện những nhiệm vụ hộ tống tại chỗ hỗ trợ huấn luyện tàu ngầm đặt căn cứ tại New London, Connecticut. Vào cuối mùa Thu, nó rời Xưởng hải quân New York, Brooklyn, New York để tham gia Mặt trận Thái Bình Dương, đi ngang qua kênh đào Panama và Trân Châu Cảng.

1943 Sửa đổi

Waller đi đến Efate vào ngày 21 tháng 1 năm 1943, rồi khởi hành sáu ngày sau đó trong thành phần đội tàu khu trục hộ tống cho Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 18 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Chuẩn đô đốc Robert C. Giffen, đặt cờ hiệu của mình trên chiếc tàu tuần dương hạng nặng USS Wichita. Nhiệm vụ của lực lượng này là gặp gỡ ngoài khơi Guadalcanal cùng một lực lượng vận tải chuyên chở tiếp liệu và binh lính tăng viện cho lực lượng đồn trú trên bộ tại đây nhằm đánh bật quân Nhật ra khỏi hòn đảo then chốt này. Những báo cáo tình báo về việc quân Nhật đang cố gắng thúc đẩy một đợt tăng viện lớn cho lực lượng của họ, sau cùng được xác thực là sai lầm các diễn biến sau đó cho thấy đối phương đang triệt thoái binh lính khỏi hòn đảo.

Trận chiến đảo Rennel Sửa đổi

Vào ngày 29 tháng 1, ở vị trí cách 50 dặm (80 km) về phía Bắc đảo Rennell, máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi Nhật Bản Mitsubishi G4M ("Betty") bay đến ở tầm thấp từ phía Đông, ẩn nấp trong thời tiết nhá nhem. Đang trong đội hình bên mạn phải của soái hạm Wichita cùng các tàu tuần dương Chicago (CA-29) và Louisville (CA-28), Waller chịu đựng hỏa lực súng máy của chiếc "Betty" dẫn đầu khi nó bắt đầu tấn công. Các con tàu Mỹ đáp trả bằng hỏa lực phòng không mạnh mẽ nhắm vào hai chiếc dẫn đầu, một chiếc bị bắn rơi và nổ tung trên biển. Đến 19 giờ 31 phút, một đợt tấn công mới bởi những chiếc "Betty" tập trung vào những chiếc tàu tuần dương hạng nặng. Một máy bay đối phương bị bắn rơi ngay phía đuôi của Waller, trước khi một chiếc khác ghi một quả ngư lôi trúng đích vào Chicago lúc 19 giờ 45 phút, khiến chiếc tàu tuần dương bị thủng một lổ lớn phía trước bên mạn phải, và khiến ba trong số bốn trục chân vịt ngừng hoạt động. Một quả ngư lôi thứ hai lại trúng đích, làm ngập nước phòng nồi hơi số hai và phòng động cơ phía trước, khiến Chicago chết đứng giữa biển.

Trận chiến trở nên lắng dịu, cho phép lực lượng Hoa Kỳ nghỉ ngơi. Louisville kéo chiếc tàu tuần dương chị em bị đánh hỏng, và sang sáng sớm ngày 30 tháng 1, Chicago di chuyển về phía Espiritu Santo với vận tốc 4 kn (7,4 km/h). Đến 14 giờ 45 phút, ngay sau khi Louisville chuyển giao nhiệm vụ cứu hộ cho chiếc tàu kéo Navajo (AT-64), một tốp 12 máy bay "Betty" được phát hiện ở phía Nam New Georgia hướng về phía đảo Rennell. Máy bay tiêm kích tuần tra chiến đấu trên không cất cánh từ tàu sân bay USS Enterprise (CV-6) đã bắn rơi ba chiếc trong số chúng, nhưng chín chiếc còn lại tấn công nhắm vào Chicago. Bảy máy bay tấn công đã bị hỏa lực phòng không của lực lượng đặc nhiệm và máy bay Grumman F4F Wildcat của Enterprise bắn rơi Waller góp công bắn rơi một chiếc Mitsubishi G4M và làm hư hại hai chiếc khác.

Tuy nhiên, Chicago trúng thêm hai quả ngư lôi và bị buộc phải bỏ lại không lâu sau đó, nó đắm với đuôi chìm trước lúc 16 giờ 44 phút. Navajo, Sands (APD-13), Edwards (DD-619) và Waller đã cứu vớt 1.049 người sống sót từ chiếc tàu tuần dương. Trong trận chiến lộn xộn, tàu khu trục La Vallette (DD-448) bị hư hại và được Navajo kéo ra khỏi khu vực. Đang khi rút lui về Espiritu Santo, Waller bắt được tín hiệu sonar một tàu ngầm đối phương, nhưng không thể truy đuổi.

Trận chiến đảo Rennel kết thúc với việc Hoa Kỳ mất một tàu tuần dương, và một tàu khu trục bị hư hại. Tuy nhiên họ thành công trong việc ngăn chặn đòn tấn công vào các tàu vận chuyển ngoài khơi Lunga Point, cho phép tăng viện lực lượng Đồng Minh vào giai đoạn cuối nhằm đánh đuổi quân Nhật khỏi Guadalcanal.

Eo biển Blackett Sửa đổi

Đến đầu tháng 3, Đại tá Hải quân Arleigh Burke chuyển cờ hiệu Tư lệnh hải đội sang chiếc Waller. Vào ngày 5 tháng 3, nó dẫn trước Conway (DD-507), Montpelier (CL-57), Cleveland (CL-55), Denver (CL-58) và Cony (DD-508) trong một cuộc bắn phá sân bay đối phương tại Vila, trên bờ biển phía Nam của New Georgia. Được phân công bảo vệ các tàu chiến lớn, nó tham gia vô hiệu hóa các khẩu đội pháo phòng thủ duyên hải đối phương vốn đã can thiệp vào các tàu tuần dương khi chúng tiến hành cuộc bắn phá chính.

Tiến vào vịnh Kula sau nữa đêm ngày 5 tháng 3, radar của Waller đã phát hiện hai tàu đối phương, sau này được xác định là các tàu khu trục MurasameMinegumo, ở lối ra vào phía Đông của eo biển Blackett, đang di chuyển với tốc độ nhanh do rõ ràng không nhận biết sự hiện diện của các tàu chiến Hoa Kỳ. Waller tấn công lúc khoảng 01 giờ 00, phóng một loạt năm quả ngư lôi ở khoảng cách 3,5 nmi (6,5 km), rồi các khẩu pháo của nó khai hỏa một phút sau đó. Hoàn toàn bị bất ngờ, hai tàu khu trục Nhật bắn trả bằng hỏa lực rời rạc và kém chính xác. Sáu phút sau khi trận chiến bắt đầu, Murasame vỡ làm đôi sau một vụ nổ dữ dội, hậu quả của trúng ngư lôi và hải pháo từ Waller và các tàu đồng đội. Minegumo chịu đựng số phận tương tự, biến thành một xác tàu cháy bùng cho dù cố nổi thêm được một ít lâu.

Để lại các con tàu đối phương bị phá hủy, lực lượng Hoa Kỳ chuyển hướng sang phía Tây lúc 01 giờ 14 phút, tiến hành bắn phá Vila theo kế hoạch, dội pháo xuống sân bay đối phương trong 16 phút trước khi ngừng bắn và rút lui, để lại nhiều đám cháy trong đêm tối. Waller được phân công kết liễu Minegumo nhưng đối thủ đã nổ tung và đắm trước khi chiếc tàu khu trục Hoa Kỳ hành động.

Sau Trận chiến eo biển Blackett, Waller tiếp tục hoạt động tại khu vực quần đảo Solomon cho đến hết năm 1943 và sang năm 1944, khi phía Nhật Bản nỗ lực tiếp tế cho lực lượng đồn trú của họ trên các đảo biệt lập như Vella Lavella, Arundel và Kolombangara. Họ sử dụng các tàu khu trục như những tàu vận tải và tiếp liệu, được biết đến như những chuyến "Tốc hành Tokyo". Chúng thường xuyên đụng độ với các tàu tuần dương và tàu khu trục Hoa Kỳ trong những trận chiến ngắn ngủi nhưng khốc liệt.

Phía Hoa Kỳ tiếp tục gây áp lực cho đối phương, thường xuyên bắn phá quấy rối các hòn đảo từ mặt biển và từ trên không. Trong đêm 29-30 tháng 6, Wallercùng bốn tàu tuần dương và ba tàu khu trục khác đã bắn phá đồn điền Vila-Stanmore, Kolombangara và quần đảo Shortland, phần lớn cuộc bắn phá diễn ra trong hoàn cảnh thời tiết xấu vốn hạn chế tầm nhìn, nên khó xác định được tổn thất gây ra cho đối phương.

Vịnh Kula Sửa đổi

Không lâu sau đó, vào ngày 6 tháng 7 năm 1943, một đội đặc nhiệm bao gồm ba tàu tuần dương và bốn tàu khu trục dưới quyền Chuẩn đô đốc Walden L. Ainsworth đã đụng độ với mười tàu khu trục Nhật Bản vận chuyển binh lính và tiếp tế đến Kolombangara trong Trận chiến vịnh Kula. Trong trận chiến đêm ác liệt, các tàu khu trục Nhật NiizukiNagatsuki bị đánh chìm phía Hoa Kỳ cũng bị tổn thất tàu tuần dương hạng nhẹ Helena (CL-50) khi nó trúng ngư lôi Long Lance tầm xa đặc biệt nguy hiểm.

Trong những nỗ lực nhằm cứu vớt thủy thủ đoàn của Helena, Waller phục vụ trong lực lượng bảo vệ cho các tàu khu trục Woodworth (DD-460) và Gwin (DD-433) tham gia các nỗ lực cứu hộ ban đầu. Waller phát hiện một tàu ngầm qua màn hình radar và nỗ lực truy tìm con tàu đối phương và sau ba giờ tìm kiếm nó phát hiện tín hiệu của mục tiêu và thả mìn sâu để tấn công. Cho dù không có chứng cứ đã tiêu diệt được mục tiêu, Tư lệnh Đội đặc nhiệm 36.2, Chuẩn đô đốc Aaron S. Merrill đã ghi nhận những công lao của con tàu qua báo cáo tác chiến.

Bắn nhầm Sửa đổi

Waller tiếp tục hỗ trợ cho các chiến dịch tại quần đảo Solomon khi hộ tống các đoàn tàu chở quân và tiếp liệu. Đang khi hộ tống cho Đội đặc nhiệm 31.2 bao gồm bốn tàu khu trục và bốn tàu vận chuyển cao tốc (APD) hướng đến vịnh Enogai, New Georgia, máy bay trinh sát đã phát hiện một mục tiêu giống như tàu đối phương gần đảo Kolombangara, và đã báo cáo qua vô tuyến. Chiếc tàu khu trục trong thành phần lực lượng bảo vệ đã đổi hướng để đánh chặn, trông thấy ba tàu "đối phương" dọc bờ biển, thực ra là các xuồng phóng lôi PT-157, PT-159PT-160 đang hoạt động tuần tra, vô tình trôi dạt lên phía Bắc khu vực được phân công.

Không biết được điều này, Waller khai hỏa nhắm vào "đối phương" ở khoảng cách 20.000 yd (18 km), và các tàu cùng đội báo cáo trông thấy bắn trúng mục tiêu, nhưng may mắn là thực sự không trúng đích. Bị lâm vào một hoàn cảnh hiểm nghèo, những chiếc PT boat phóng hết số ngư lôi họ mang theo vào "đối phương" tấn công trước khi rút lui về phía Nam. Waller và đồng đội cũng may mắn không tiếp tục truy đuổi "đối phương" đang rút chạy nhưng tách ra khỏi trận chiến, quay trở lại bảo vệ những chiếc APD, tin rằng đã bắn trúng một "tàu khu trục Nhật Bản".

Vela Lavella Sửa đổi

Không có sự cố nhầm lẫn nào khác trong các hoạt động của Waller vào ngày 15 tháng 8, khi hỗ trợ cho các cuộc đổ bộ lên Vella Lavella. Lúc 08 giờ 00, khoảng mười máy bay ném bom bổ nhào Nhật Bản xuất hiện trên màn hình radar ở khoảng cách 38 dặm (61 km). Chiếc tàu khu trục cung cấp ô hỏa lực phòng không bảo vệ cho lực lượng đổ bộ, ngăn chặn những kẻ tấn công bên ngoài tầm tấn công, và tự nhận đã bắn rơi hai chiếc Aichi D3A "Val". Cuối ngày hôm đó, nó lại chiến đấu chống lại những máy bay tấn công khi bắt gặp tám máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi trên màn hình radar đang đối đầu trực diện ở tầm thấp. Hỏa lực dàn pháo chính 5-inch điều khiển tập trung đã nhắm vào những máy bay Nakajima B5N "Kate" tấn công, nhưng không bắn rơi được chiếc nào.

Chiều tối ngày 17 tháng 8, do hoạt động cơ động để né tránh một đợt không kích của đối phương, Waller và tàu khu trục Philip (DD-498) đã mắc tai nạn va chạm với nhau. Nó phải rút lui khỏi khu vực chiến sự để sửa chữa, trước khi quay trở lại hoạt động vào đầu tháng 10.

Chiến dịch quần đảo Solomon Sửa đổi

Trong đêm 1-2 tháng 10, Waller tiến vào vùng biển ngoài khơi Vella Lavella để ngăn chặn những nỗ lực triệt thái binh lính Nhật Bản khỏi hòn đảo. Nó đã phá hủy sáu sà lan đối phương trong đêm thứ nhất và thêm bốn chiếc trong đêm tiếp theo. Tổng cộng 46 tàu bè đối phương đã bị tàu tuần dương, tàu khu trục và PT-boat Hoa Kỳ tiêu diệt trong đợt này. Chiếc tàu khu trục tiếp tục nhiệm vụ hộ tống vận tải và hỗ trợ trong những tháng tiếp theo. Vào ngày 17-18 tháng 11, khi lực lượng Hoa Kỳ tiến quân về hướng đảo Bougainville, Waller hộ tống cho một lượt tàu vận chuyển và tiếp liệu tăng viện. Lực lượng bao gồm sáu tàu khu trục, tám tàu APD, một tàu kéo hạm đội và tám tàu đổ bộ LST, đang băng qua vịnh Nữ hoàng Augusta ngoài khơi bờ biển Bougainville khi 10 máy bay ném bom-ngư lôi Nhật Bản kéo đến nhanh và thấp lúc khoảng 03 giờ 00. Các con tàu nhanh chóng dựng một hàng rào hỏa lực phòng không để ngăn chặn những kẻ tấn công.

Máy bay đối phương thả pháo sáng và phao nổi, chiếu rõ cả một vùng chiến trường hỏa lực phòng không dày đặc đan chéo bầu trời, và một chiếc "Betty" bị bắn rơi ở phía mũi bên mạn trái tàu khu trục Pringle (DD-477). Một chiếc khác tiếp cận nhanh và thấp lúc 03 giờ 30 phút cũng bị hỏa lực phòng không bắn cháy rơi xuống phía đuôi tàu khu trục Conway, không quả ngư lôi nào chúng phóng ra trúng đích. Tuy nhiên, hai phút sau, một chiếc khác đã phóng ngư lôi đánh trúng tàu vận chuyển cao tốc McKean (APD-5), mà sau đó bị đắm. Khi trận chiến kết thúc, Waller đã vớt tám phi công Nhật Bản bị bắn rơi. Không lâu sau đó, các con tàu rút lui đến ngoài khơi Torokina, Bougainville, trên bờ vịnh Nữ hoàng Augusta, cùng đợt tàu tiếp liệu tăng viện tiếp theo. Vào ngày 23 tháng 11, con tàu đã bắn phá đảo Marine.

1944 Sửa đổi

Waller và các tàu chị em đã bắn phá các vị trí đối phương trên đảo Buka và khu vực vịnh Choiseul vào ngày 1 tháng 2 năm 1944. Lúc 06 giờ 25 phút, các khẩu đội pháo bờ biển đối phương tại Buka đã khai hỏa vào các tàu chiến Hoa Kỳ, và đã lập tức phản pháo vào chúng, làm im tiếng một khẩu pháo đối phương. Sang đêm hôm sau, trong cuộc đổ bộ lên đảo Green, chiếc tàu khu trục đã cùng với Saufley (DD-465), Renshaw (DD-499) và Philip bắn phá trạm radar Nhật Bản tại mũi St. George và các sân bay Borpop và Namatanai. Tuy nhiên, thời tiết bất lợi cản trở tầm nhìn ảnh hưởng đến việc trinh sát pháo binh và không thể đánh giá hiệu quả của đợt bắn phá.

Chiến dịch quần đảo Mariana Sửa đổi

Sau khi quay trở về quần đảo Hawaii cho một đợt nghỉ ngơi, Waller lại khởi hành từ Trân Châu Cảng để đi Saipan, quần đảo Mariana ngang qua Kwajalein, hộ tống cho Đội đặc nhiệm 51.18, một lực lượng viễn chinh dự bị hỗ trợ cho chiến dịch Mariana, sẵn sàng đổ bộ lên một trong những mục tiêu Saipan, Guam hay Tinian tùy tình hình đòi hỏi. Saipan sau đó được xác định là mục tiêu, và con tàu đã nả pháo lên các vị trí của quân Nhật trên đảo này. Đến chiều tối ngày 18 tháng 6, nó nhận mệnh lệnh hỗ trợ hỏa lực lên hai khu vực nhằm giúp binh lính Thủy quân Lục chiến chống trả đợt tấn công bằng xe tăng của đối phương nó cùng Pringle tiến vào vịnh Magicienne lúc 17 giờ 55 phút.

Waller tiếp cận gần bờ biển để quan sát rõ hơn nhưng không phát hiện bất kỳ xe tăng nào của Hoa Kỳ hay Nhật Bản. Đến 17 giờ 58 phút, nó tắt động cơ để quan sát rõ hơn, nhưng ba phút sau đó các khẩu pháo đối phương đã nhắm vào hai chiếc tàu khu trục. Cả Waller lẫn Pringle đều phải mở hết tốc độ vọt lên phía trước về hướng Đông để né tránh đạn pháo đối phương vây quanh hai con tàu nhưng không có phát nào bắn trúng khi họ biến mất trong làn khói và sương mù.

Lực lượng Hoa Kỳ quay trở lại Guam vào mùa Hè 1944, khi Waller tham gia chiến dịch trong vai trò hộ tống cho lực lượng đổ bộ lên hòn đảo. Nó sau đó chuyển sang hỗ trợ hỏa lực và hộ tống ngoài khơi khi đảo Tinian này bị tấn công vào tháng 8. Sau khi kết thúc chiến dịch, con tàu quay trở về vùng bờ Đông để tái trang bị, kéo dài cho đến mùa Thu năm 1944.

Chiến dịch Philippines Sửa đổi

Waller sau đó gia nhập Đệ Thất hạm đội vào ngày 27 tháng 11 để tham gia các chiến dịch tại quần đảo Philippine. Xế trưa hôm đó, nó được Nhật Bản chào đón bằng một đợt không kích bởi 15 máy bay tự sát. Con tàu đã bắn rơi một máy bay tấn công và trợ giúp vào việc tiêu diệt một chiếc khác. Trong đêm 27-28 tháng 11, nó dẫn đầu bốn chiếc khác thuộc Đội khu trục 43 trong một đợt càn quét ban đêm vào vịnh Ormoc nhằm chuẩn bị cho việc đổ bộ lực lượng Hoa Kỳ tại đây. Lực lượng đã bắn phá các điểm tập trung quân đối phương và càn quét tàu bè ven biển, nả pháo lên bờ trong hơn một giờ trước khi chuyển sang biển Camotes truy lùng tàu bè đối phương.

Sau nữa đêm ngày 28 tháng 11, một máy bay tuần tra Đồng Minh phát hiện một tàu ngầm Nhật Bản, sau này được xác định là chiếc I-46, nổi trên mặt nước về phía Nam đảo Pacijan và đang hướng đến vịnh Ormoc. Đội khu trục 43 đã đổi hướng để đánh chặn, và đến 01 giờ 27 phút, radar của Waller bắt được mục tiêu ngoài khơi bờ biển phía Bắc đảo Ponson. Nó bắn vào chiếc tàu ngầm đối phương bằng mọi cỡ pháo và truyền lệnh chuẩn bị để húc chìm đối phương, nhưng thay đổi mệnh lệnh vào phút chót và tiếp tục bắn pháo vào mục tiêu. Đối phương bắn trả bằng hỏa lực rời rạc và không hiệu quả, và đến 01 giờ 45 phút, I-46 đắm với đuôi chìm trước.

Waller tiếp tục ở lại khu vực vịnh Leyte cho đến ngày 2 tháng 12, sau khi thực hiện một đợt càn quét thứ hai vào biển Camotes trong đêm 29-30 tháng 11 nhằm truy tìm một đoàn tàu vận tải 10 chiếc được báo cáo. Nó không tìm thấy mục tiêu, nhưng cũng đã phát hiện và tiêu diệt sáu sà lan đối phương. Trong một đợt không kích khác của đối phương xuống vịnh Ormoc, nó chịu đựng ba quả bom rơi cách con tàu vài trăm mét. Đến giữa tháng 12, con tàu tham gia cuộc tấn công lên Mindoro như một đơn vị thuộc lực lượng bảo vệ cho các thiết giáp hạm, tàu sân bay hộ tống và tàu tuần dương. Vào ngày 15 tháng 12, lực lượng đã chống trả một đợt tấn công Kamikaze nặng nề trong biển Sulu, nơi chiếc tàu khu trục bắn rơi một kẻ tấn công và trợ giúp tiêu diệt một chiếc khác. Một máy bay ném bom hai động cơ Mitsubishi G4M "Betty" đã dự định tấn công tự sát vào Waller, trước khi bị hỏa lực phòng không dày đặc bắn hạ.

1945 Sửa đổi

Vào đầu tháng 1 năm 1945, Waller chuyển trọng tâm hoạt động sang vịnh Lingayen khi lực lượng Hoa Kỳ đổ bộ lên khu vực này. Nó đã đánh chìm hai xuồng máy chứa chất nổ cảm tử và bắn khoảng 3.000 quả đạn pháo vào cả những mục tiêu trên không và mặt biển. Cho dù không bắn rơi máy bay đối phương nào, nó đã bắn trúng gây hư hại cho nhiều kẻ tấn công. Sang tháng 2 và tháng 3, nó hộ tống các đoàn tàu vận tải vận chuyển lực lượng và tiếp liệu. Trong cuộc đổ bộ lên Basilan, chiếc tàu khu trục đã phục vụ như soái hạm cho đội đặc nhiệm, rồi nhận nhiệm vụ bắn hỏa lực hỗ trợ tại Tawi Tawi và Jolo thuộc quần đảo Sulu trong tháng 4.

Waller tiếp tục tham gia chiến dịch tấn công phối hợp của lực lượng Hoa Kỳ và Australia lên Borneo từ tháng 5 đến tháng 7. Nó hộ tống các đoàn tàu vận tải đi đến đảo Tarakan, vịnh Brunei và Balikpapan, cũng như hỗ trợ các hoạt động quét mìn tại khu vực Miri về phía Tây vịnh Brunei. Nó gia nhập Đệ Tam hạm đội vào đầu tháng 8 nhằm chuẩn bị cho Chiến dịch Downfall, kế hoạch đổ bộ của Đồng Minh lên chính quốc Nhật Bản. Trên đường hướng đến Honshū, Nhật Bản hộ tống một đoàn tàu vận tải, nó nhận được tin tức về việc Nhật Bản đầu hàng kết thúc cuộc xung đột.

Một lần nữa quay trở lại cùng Đệ Thất hạm đội, Waller đi đến Thượng Hải, Trung Quốc vào ngày 19 tháng 9 cho một lượt phục vụ cùng lực lượng Tuần tra Dương Tử được tái thành lập, là một trong những tàu chiến Hoa Kỳ cặp cảng thành phố này. Nó giúp giải giới một căn cứ xuồng cảm tử Nhật Bản khi một đội đổ bộ 21 người từ chiếc tàu khu trục đã giúp đỡ giới chức Trung Quốc trong việc giải giáp khoảng 2.700 quân Nhật tại Định Hải.

Đang khi quay trở lại Thượng Hải vào ngày 9 tháng 10, Waller va phải một quả mìn tiếp xúc kiểu "Thượng Hải" do Nhật cài còn sót lại, khiến ba sĩ quan và 22 thủy thủ bị thương. Con tàu bị bị hư hại cấu trúc đến mức phải được đưa vào Xưởng tàu Giang Nam tại Thượng Hải để sửa chữa. Nó sau đó giám sát và hỗ trợ tiếp liệu cho các con tàu tham gia hoạt động quét mìn, phá hủy khoảng 60 quả mìn, cũng như cung cấp hoa tiêu sông Dương Tử cho các con tàu đi vào sông, giám sát tàu bè di chuyển ngang qua trạm tuần tra của nó ở cửa sông Dương Tử. Nó rời vùng biển Trung Quốc để quay trở về Hoa Kỳ vào ngày 12 tháng 12, ghé qua Trân Châu Cảng và về đến San Diego vào ngày 30 tháng 12. Waller được cho xuất biên chế và đưa về lực lượng dự bị thuộc Quân khu 6 Hải quân, neo đậu tại Charleston, South Carolina.

Chiến tranh Triều Tiên Sửa đổi

Ngay trước khi Chiến tranh Triều Tiên bùng nổ, do tình hình quan hệ quốc tế căng thẳng, Waller nằm trong số các tàu khu trục lớp Fletcher được chọn để cải biến thành một tàu khu trục hộ tống, được xếp lại lớp với ký hiệu lườn mới DDE-466 vào ngày 26 tháng 3 năm 1949 và nhập biên chế trở lại tại Charleston vào ngày 5 tháng 7 năm 1950. Sau khi hoàn tất chạy thử máy, nó gia nhập Hải đội Khu trục Hộ tống 2 trong vai trò soái hạm vào ngày 28 tháng 1 năm 1951.

Vào ngày 14 tháng 5, Waller lên đường hướng sang phía Tây để tham gia Chiến tranh Triều Tiên, gia nhập Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 95 khi đơn vị này tiến đến cảng Wonsan. Trong mười ngày tiếp theo, nó tiến hành bắn phá các mục tiêu của lực lượng Bắc Triều Tiên trên bờ, tiêu phí khoảng 1.700 quả đạn pháo 5 inch vào các vị trí đối phương. Trong mùa Hè tiếp theo, nó tham gia thành phần hộ tống cho các đơn vị thuộc Đệ Thất hạm đội tập trận tại vùng biển ngoài khơi Okinawa trước khi quay trở lại hoạt động phong tỏa bờ biển bán đảo Triều Tiên vào tháng 10, làm nhiệm vụ trong hai tuần trước khi quay trở về Hoa Kỳ.

Từ năm 1951 đến cuối năm 1956, Waller tham gia nhiều cuộc tập trận chống tàu ngầm ngoài khơi vùng bờ Đông, và thực hiện hai lượt bố trí sang Địa Trung Hải và hai lượt hoạt động tại vùng biển Caribe. Nó đi vào Xưởng hải quân Norfolk vào cuối năm 1956 cho một lượt cải biến rộng rãi, lần này là nhằm nâng cao hệ thống vũ khí chống tàu ngầm. Nó gia nhập trở lại hạm đội sau khi hoàn tất, thực hiện một lượt bố trí sang Địa Trung Hải vào năm 1957, rồi gia nhập Hải đội Khu trục 28 như một đơn vị thuộc Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm Chống tàu ngầm Alfa. Ký hiệu lườn của nó được xếp quay trở lại DD-466 vào ngày 30 tháng 6 năm 1962.

Chiến tranh Việt Nam Sửa đổi

Gia nhập Hải đội Khu trục 36 vào ngày 1 tháng 7 năm 1964, Waller thực hiện nhiều đợt bố trí sang Địa Trung Hải trong bốn năm tiếp theo. Đến ngày 6 tháng 9 năm 1968, nó cùng Đội khu trục 362 rời Norfolk, Virginia để đi sang vùng biển ngoài khơi Việt Nam. Đến nơi vào tháng 10, nó tham gia tuần tra tại Trạm Yankee trong vịnh Bắc Bộ, và sau đó ngoài khơi Quy Nhơn, Nam Việt Nam, nơi nó hỗ trợ hải pháo cho lực lượng Nam Triều Tiên chiến đấu tại đây. Chiếc tàu khu trục lại di chuyển xuống phía Nam ngoài khơi Phan Thiết hỗ trợ cho hoạt động của Lữ đoàn 173 Nhảy dù Hoa Kỳ, bắn tổng cộng 2400 quả đạn pháo.

Quay trở lại Trạm Yankee, Waller gia nhập cùng tàu sân bay Intrepid (CVS-11) để làm nhiệm vụ hộ tống cho đến khi Intrepid rút lui. Nó lại tiếp tục hộ tống cho tàu sân bay Ranger (CV-61) cho đến ngày 2 tháng 3 năm 1969, khi nó lên đường quay trở về nhà. Thoạt tiên được dự định hoạt động như một tàu huấn luyện Hải quân Dự bị, nhưng sau khi được khảo sát con tàu được cho xuất biên chế và rút khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 15 tháng 7 năm 1969. Lườn tàu được sử dụng như một mục tiêu vào ngày 2 tháng 2 năm 1970, và nó bị đánh chìm ngoài khơi Rhode Island vào ngày 17 tháng 6 năm 1970.

Waller được tặng thưởng mười hai Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích chiến đấu trong Thế Chiến II thêm hai Ngôi sao Chiến trận khi phục vụ trong Chiến tranh Triều Tiên và hai Ngôi sao Chiến trận nữa khi phục vụ trong Chiến tranh Việt Nam.

List of site sources >>>


Watch the video: Renaissancing (January 2022).