Geography

Time zones


Our planet has a spherical shape. For this reason, when it rotates (the earth moves around itself), one part is illuminated by the sun, while the other is dark.

As this movement takes place, the areas that were illuminated gradually lose their brightness, that is, where it is morning soon becomes late, and so on.

The earth has 360 °, and the day is composed of 24 hours. So if we divide 360 ​​° by 24, we total 15 °, which is 60 minutes, that is 1 hour. The rotation movement is responsible for the emergence of days and nights. The man instituted different times in the world, and from then on he entered the system of time zones.

The whole world has 24 spindles altogether and each of these corresponds to an imaginary line drawn from one pole to the other. In this way each spindle is between two meridians. Every terrestrial portion that is established in this interval has the same time.

Prior to the deployment of the spindles, there were several setbacks and problems. For this reason, in 1884, an astronomers conference was held in the United States, in which the standardization of time in all parts of the planet was discussed.

The Greenwich Meridian is the prime meridian, as this is the starting point or reference point for spindle deployment. From then on the east meridian of Greenwich, each time zone is advanced one hour, and westwards one hour late. For example: When in Los Angeles in the USA it is 14 hours, in Baghdad Iraq (city located eleven time zones apart) it will be 1 hour. Below we will look at the existing time zones in Brazil.